Santiago Oaks Regional Park

Orange, California 92861

Santiago Oaks Regional Park

Santiago Oaks Regional Park Professional Guide

Detailed Trail Description from our Guidebook

"What Santiago Oaks Regional Park lacks in sheer size its rare beauty more than adequately compensates for. The core of the park is made up of two former ranch properties acquired in the mid-1970s. A small Valencia orange grove and many acres of ornamental trees planted around 1960 on these properties complement the natural riparian and oak-woodland communities along Santiago Creek."

More Santiago Oaks Regional Park Professional Guides

Detailed Trail Descriptions from Our Guidebooks

"Stop at the engaging nature center before hitting the trail—lots of park trails, in fact. Sure bets are aptly named Santiago Creek Trail and other footpaths that meander near the creek. Historic Dam Trail leads to.. an old dam. With the aid of Chinese laborers, the Serrano and Carpenter Water Company built a clay dam here in 1879. This dam was destroyed by floods, and replaced in 1892 with a more substantial structure of river rock and cement. The dam looks particularly tiny when compared to the huge Villa Park Flood Control dam a short distance upstream." Read more
Afoot & Afield: Orange County (Wilderness Press)
Jerry Schad and David Money Harris
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"What Santiago Oaks Regional Park lacks in sheer size is more than adequately compensated for by its rare beauty. The core of the park is made up of two former ranch properties acquired in the mid-1970s. A small Valencia orange grove and many acres of ornamental trees planted around 1960 on these properties complement the natural riparian and oak-woodland communities along Santiago Creek." Read more
Best Easy Day Hikes: Orange County (Falcon Guides)
Randy Vogel
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"This easy, meandering hike follows a series of footpaths along and across the lower Santiago Creek. Santiago Creek is one of the main drainages for the Santa Ana Mountains. A great outing for families, the hike features sycamore and oak trees, picnic areas, and historical ties to early Orange County history." Read more
"This hike begins near the summit of Robber’s Peak at the end of Nohl Ranch Road. The 1,1 52-foot sandstone peak offers 360-degree views from the Santa Ana Mountains to the Orange County basin. The trail to the peak overlooks Santiago Oaks Regional Park, then heads north on the Anaheim Hills Trail along the sinuous west cliffs above Weir Canyon. The route makes a loop by returning along residential Serrano Avenue." Read more
"This hike strolls along the creek to the historic dam that spans 1 1 0 feet. The trail continues up the rolling foothills on the north side of the creek and through an old nursery of ornamental and exotic trees. The nursery was planted in 1955 by former land owner Harry Rinker." Read more

Santiago Oaks Regional Park Reviews

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9/27/2018
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9/8/2009
There was lots of tarantulas. It's tarantula breeding season and they all came out at dusk. Other then that it's a nice place to hike.
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6/26/2005
Nice area for family hiking. Dusty, but well-marked, not very strenuous rolling hills with a few streams and a few groves of trees. The 'seasonal ponds' are fascinating with an abundance of flowers.
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4/3/2001
I have hiked here a few times in the last year, each time taking a different route. The scenery is always breathtaking no matter the time of year. Old Oak trees stand in the midst of grass-covered meadows. The high points of the hills provide beautiful views of the prairies stretching between the mesas and the mountains beyond. If you go in the Spring, you will see a great variety of wildflowers in bloom, including the rare Chocolate Lily. These trails also boast the oldest structure in Riverside County. It's an old adobe cowboy bunkhouse built in 1846. The terrain is not tough and the trails are well-kept. Highly recommended!
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Trail Information

Orange
Nearby City
Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Accessibility
3
Distance
400 feet
Elevation Gain
Loop/Lollipop
Trail Type
Moderate
Skill Level
½–1½ hours
Duration
7 a.m.–sunset, all year; trails closed three days after rains
Season
City of Orange
Local Contacts
USGS 7.5-minute Orange
Local Maps