Mount Russell Fishhook Arete

Lone Pine, California

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
From the summit of Mt. Whitney, you can see an obvious curving arete dropping from the west summit of Mt. Russell; this is the Fishhook Arete. This route features excellent and exposed climbing, topping out on a great summit. The first ascent was made by John Cleare and Gary Colliver. Cleare is a British climber and writer of mountaineering literature who had climbed with Yosemite local Colliver on Mt. Everest in 1971. Colliver has been a guide and climbing ranger in Yosemite Park for more than 30 years. Standing below the buttress to the right of the Rowell-Jones route, Colliver and Cleare had their pick of lines. Colliver later recounted, “We gazed at the spiky summit ridge—a mile long—and a half dozen ribs and spurs, which buttressed it in this south side.” The Rowell-Jones route on the west face was in steep profile, and the pair knew that Fred Beckey had done a route on the northeast side. Faced with so many fine alternatives, they asked each other “Which line should we try?” The pair picked the most obvious feature and found excellent climbing on solid granite up the arete.
Climbing California's High Sierra

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Climbing California's High Sierra

by John Moynier & Claude Fiddler (Falcon Guides)

From the summit of Mt. Whitney, you can see an obvious curving arete dropping from the west summit of Mt. Russell; this is the Fishhook Arete. This route features excellent and exposed climbing, topping out on a great summit. The first ascent was made by John Cleare and Gary Colliver. Cleare is a British climber and writer of mountaineering literature who had climbed with Yosemite local Colliver on Mt. Everest in 1971. Colliver has been a guide and climbing ranger in Yosemite Park for more than 30 years. Standing below the buttress to the right of the Rowell-Jones route, Colliver and Cleare had their pick of lines. Colliver later recounted, “We gazed at the spiky summit ridge—a mile long—and a half dozen ribs and spurs, which buttressed it in this south side.” The Rowell-Jones route on the west face was in steep profile, and the pair knew that Fred Beckey had done a route on the northeast side. Faced with so many fine alternatives, they asked each other “Which line should we try?” The pair picked the most obvious feature and found excellent climbing on solid granite up the arete.

©  John Moynier & Claude Fiddler/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Climbing
Nearby City: Lone Pine
Class: Class 5.6 - 5.8
Local Contacts: Inyo National Forest; Sequoia National Park
Local Maps: USGS Mt. Whitney, Mt. Langley
Grade: Grade III
Driving Directions: Directions to Mount Russell: Fishhook Arete

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Activity Feed

May 2018