Las Trampas Ridge and Calaveras Ridge Trail

Las Trampas Regional Wilderness, California

Distance4.5mi
Elevation Gain3,308ft
Trailhead Elevation1,275ft
Top1,784ft
Elevation Min/Max1275/1784ft
Elevation Start/End1275/1275ft

Las Trampas Ridge and Calaveras Ridge Trail

Las Trampas Ridge & Calaveras Ridge Trail is a hiking, biking, and horse trail in Danville, California. It is within Las Trampas Regional Wilderness. It is 4.5 miles long and begins at 1,275 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 9.3 miles with a total elevation gain of 3,308 feet. This trail connects with the following: Sulphur Springs Trail, Chamise Trail, Corduroy Hills Trail, Trapline Trail, Del Amigo Trail, Bollinger Creek Loop Trail, Las Trampas Peak View Trail, Las Trampas to Briones Trail and Madrone Trail.

Las Trampas Ridge & Calaveras Ridge Trail Professional Reviews and Guides

"The steep hills of Las Trampas Regional Wilderness host a variety of plant communities— flower-dotted meadows, vast thickets of multi-scented chaparral, lush streamside habitat, oak-studded hillsides—and they allow extensive vistas of the Bay Area. The sandstone contains numerous fossilized clam shells."

"Exploring Las Trampas Peak via the Chamise, Las Trampas Ridge, and Bollinger Canyon trails is the goal of this semi-loop trip, which passes through oak and bay forest, chaparral, and grassland, on its way to high grounds with great views. Turn right on Bollinger Canyon Road and walk 500 feet to turnout, left. Go through a gate and follow the single-track Chamise Trail as it climbs southeast across an open hillside to a junction with the Bollinger Canyon Trail. Stay on the Chamise Trail by veering left and ascending a series of well-graded switchbacks."

"This short but scenic semi-loop trip, via Rocky Ridge Road and the Cuesta and Upper trails, takes you atop 2000-foot Rocky Ridge, the border between Las Trampas Wilderness and EBMUD lands of the Upper San Leandro Reservoir watershed. Rocky Ridge, a Nike missile site during the Cold War, rises midway between Redwood and Anthony Chabot regional parks and Mt. iablo State Park, making it a commanding vantage point with great views. After passing through the cattle gate, you begin a steep uphill walk on paved Rocky Ridge Road. After a short while the grade eases somewhat, but more climbing is just ahead, past stands of coast live oak and California bay. In wet weather, water may be running here in channels on both sides of the road. If you are here late in the day, listen for the “hoo, hoo, hoo-hoo” of a great-horned owl, but don’t be fooled by a mourning dove’s plaintive cooing. After climbing for about 0.5-mile, you round a bend and reach a junction with a single-track trail heading left and steeply uphill. Turn left, and immediately come to a fork with a trail post in the middle. Here the Rocky Ridge Trail heads right and the Cuesta Trail, your route, goes left."

"This rugged loop joins all or parts of the Chamise, Las Trampas Ridge, Corduroy Hills, Madrone, Virgil Williams, Del Amigo, Sulphur Springs, Trapline, and Mahogany trails, leading you through an amazing variety of terrain, from sunbaked chaparral to shady forest. Some of the best views in the East Bay of Mt. Diablo are to be found on this loop, which passes through a stunted forest of scrub oak and other interesting plant communities. Wet weather may bring mud and even landslide activity to parts of this route. Bring plenty of water and start early; the parking area gate may be locked at 5 P.M. Turn right on Bollinger Canyon Road and walk 500 feet to a turnout, left. Go through a gate and follow the single-track Chamise Trail as it climbs southeast across an open hillside to a junction with the Bollinger Canyon Trail. Stay on the Chamise Trail by veering left and ascending a series of well-graded switchbacks."

"A trek in 3,882-acre Las Trampas Wilderness promises windswept ridges, rugged jigsaw rock outcroppings, dusty valleys, moist springfed ravines, sunny grasslands, and the dappled shade of pungent bay trees. This hike also includes two 1,000-foot climbs up Rocky Ridge and the Devil’s Bowl.

But you are rewarded with breezy, expansive views of the San Francisco Bay, the city skylines, the distant Delta, and majestic Mount Diablo and foothills. There is still abundant wildlife in Las Trampas today and remains of animals, plants, and geological features that tell a story that’s 25 million years old."

"Las Trampas (Spanish for “the traps”) is kind of like two parks in one: From the trailhead at the bottom of a wide canyon you can hike east to chaparral-coated Las Trampas Ridge, or west to grassy Rocky Ridge. Pick this western loop in spring, after the rains have stopped, for a steady climb to Rocky Ridge, where you can enjoy sweeping views and search for wildflowers."

"A trek in 3,882-acre Las Trampas Wilderness promises you windswept ridges, rugged jigsaw rock outcroppings, dusty valleys, moist spring-fed ravines, and trails curving through sunny grasslands and under the shade of pungent bay trees. This hike also includes a couple of great calf-burning, heavy-breathing 1,000-foot climbs up Rocky Ridge and the Devil’s Hole. But you are rewarded with breezy, expansive views of the San Francisco Bay, the city skylines, the distant Delta, and majestic Mount Diablo and its valleys. Look carefully around you and you’ll see the abundant wildlife that lives in Las Trampas today and the remains of animals, plants, and geological features that tell a story that’s about twenty-five million years old. Trails Surface: Paved path to single- and double-track dirt trails."

"Named after the descent that comes three-fourths of a way through, this ride proves that no matter how jaded you are—despite having ridden everything under the sun— you can still get an adrenaline rush from descending a sixty-story wall such as Del Amigo Trail. Roller coasters have nothing on this descent, and the great part about it is that you actually get to enjoy your time at the top with views across the valley to the majestic Mount Diablo."

Las Trampas Ridge & Calaveras Ridge Trail Reviews

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2/16/2015
Loved it. Good calf burner down to devils hole and back up to the ridge. Suggest that it is not too hot, because shade is spotty. Great views, water for the dogs in devils hole (Feb). A little disappointing that it went straight down and then straight up again. Not much meandering. Fairly busy on the ridge side going down to the parking lot.
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7/10/2011
This is a wonderful trail with so much variety...views, botany, fossils, and more. The wind caves, just a short hike off-trail, are great to explore. We loved the variety of plants blooming. There are fossils of an old seabed just lying about on the ridgetop...and plenty of ups and downs to get good exercise. Finally, a sense of wildness in a big metro area.
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9/14/2008
Trail in good condition and easy to follow. Some of the signposts in intersections are empty, looks like they are being repaired. But it's almost impossible to get lost if you follow the trail description. Great views, some pretty strenuous hills, especially in 80+ degree heat. Overall nice hike, but nothing special.
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3/12/2007
Gorgeous on a clear winter day, the view from Rocky Ridge is wonderful with the rolling hills of EBMUD lands on one side and a commanding view of Mt Diablo on the other. Gets really muddy here in winter and early spring when crossing a few streams otherwise a pleasant experience.
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3/19/2006
This is definitely one of the best hikes I've done in a long time. The change of landscape throughout this hike makes this a very beautiful hike. Although the trail was a bit muddy at times (what do you expect during the winter!) it was still easy to navigate the trails.
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3/12/2005
If I could give this eTrail a better rating than a 5 I would because Monte Bello is just that pretty, that well maintained and that much fun to travel. The views (especially if you go up to Black Mountain) are unsurpassed as you will gaze on the hub-bub wilderness of the Silicon Valley. This hike just gives so much differing terrain and sights that you can't go wrong. Open space, forest, streams, grasslands, sights, sounds, and smells all dot this entire hike. Well worth the trip ole Page Mill Road and is one of the top hikes of all the Open Preserves in the area (although all have different positive points). And, oh, in March, 2005, there were a TON of Geocaches, should that be your idea of fun (like ours). Monte Bello should be renamed to "Amazing Place To Visit".
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Las Trampas Ridge & Calaveras Ridge Trail Photos

Trail Information

Las Trampas Regional Wilderness
Nearby City
Las Trampas Regional Wilderness
Parks
Moderate to Difficult
Skill Level
Horseback Riding
Additional Use
Views
Features
East Bay Regional Park District Headquarters, 2950 Peralta Oaks Ct., P.O. Box 5381, Oakland 94605; (510) 544-3276; www.eb parks.org/parks/las_trampas
Local Contacts
Las Trampas Ridge, CA
Local Maps

Activity Feed

Oct 2018