Huckleberry Path

Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve, California

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2 Reviews
5 out of 5
Huckleberry Path is a hiking trail in Contra Costa County, California. It is within Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve. It is 1.9 miles long and begins at 1,279 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 4.0 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,978 feet. Near the trailhead there are restrooms, a viewpoint, a picnic site, and an information. Along the trail there is a bench.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Huckleberry Path is a hiking trail in Contra Costa County, California. It is within Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve. It is 1.9 miles long and begins at 1,279 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 4.0 miles with a total elevation gain of 1,978 feet. Near the trailhead there are restrooms, a viewpoint, a picnic site, and an information. Along the trail there is a bench. This trail connects with the following: Bay Area Ridge Trail.
Activity Type: Hiking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve
Distance: 1.9
Elevation Gain: 1,978 feet
Trailhead Elevation: 1,279 feet
Top Elevation: 1,326 feet
Parks: Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve
Elevation Min/Max: 978/1326 ft
Elevation Start/End: 1279/1279 ft

Huckleberry Path Professional Reviews and Guides

"There are plants in the Huckleberry Botanic Regional Preserve that exist nowhere else in the East Bay. Instead of the expected oak woodland, coastal chamise and manzanita cover the hills. These plants normally exist only in select coastal areas where the climate and soils are just right, such as off the coast of central California. It is assumed that Huckleberry’s plant species originated long ago, when the bay’s climate was warmer. The hike is tricky, along sometimes steep and narrow trails. The route leads into a wooded canyon, then to the top of a ridge. Park activities include walking, picnicking, and nature study. No dogs, horses, or bikes are allowed on the Huckleberry Path. No fee is charged."

"The self-guided nature trail guide available at the trailhead provides a chance to stop and notice the details on your walk through the 235-acre preserve. It makes for some fun learning and discovery along this loop trail rich in rare vegetation. Or just walk through the thick brush and breathe. You will descend a canyon under bays and oaks and hear the trickling of San Leandro Creek below. Follow the ridge on a narrow footpath through dense shrubs, mostly huckleberries. Short side trails take you up to bald vistas, home to rare manzanitas and hosting soothing pastoral views of the surrounding foothills. This eTrail also includes suggested nearby attractions, camping & lodging, restaurants, and local outdoor retailers."

"This easy, self-guiding loop through a 240-acre botanical treasure trove is simply not to be missed, especially from late winter through spring, when its shrubs and flowers are in bloom. Among the highlights are two rare plants: western leatherwood, which is hard to find elsewhere in the East Bay; and pallid, or Alameda, manzanita, found only here and in Sobrante Ridge Botanic Regional Preserve, near El Sobrante. Boldface numbers in the route description refer to numbered markers along the trail and plant descriptions in “Huckleberry Self- Guided Nature Path,” an interpretive pamphlet available at the trailhead. Because this is a short and easy hike, you may also have time to visit nearby Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, just 0.4 mile north on Skyline Blvd."

"The most visible of the East Bay’s open spaces is dominated by rolling grassland, but Huckleberry Botanic Preserve, in the hills above Oakland, offers a tour through a variety of vegetation, including chaparral and woods. Along this short and easy 1.7-mile loop, numbered posts and a free brochure guide hikers through a wide assortment of plants, some of which are uncommon in the area."

"The self-guided nature trail guide available at the trailhead encourages you to stop and notice the details on your walk through the 235-acre preserve. It makes for fun, learning, and discovery along this loop trail rich in rare vegetation. Or you can just walk through the thick brush and breathe. Descend a canyon under bays and oaks and hear the trickling of San Leandro Creek below. Follow the ridge on a narrow footpath through dense shrubs, mostly huckleberries. Short side trails take you up to bald vistas, home to rare manzanitas and hosting soothing pastoral views of the surrounding foothills. Trails Surface: Well-maintained, narrow dirt path with one short set of downslope stairs."

"For a quick hike with a few ups and downs, head to Huckleberry on a free morning or afternoon. This mostly shaded park hosts an incredible variety of plants on canyon slopes and ridges, making it a great outing for all seasons."

Huckleberry Path Reviews

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1/17/2017
Huckleberry is one of the loveliest little walks. My kids love it because the trail is narrow and goes through tunnel like areas created by all of the foliage. There are a few nice turn offs to go to a view or a bench.
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9/18/2006
Gorgeous views of the ocean and green rolling hills. Easy footwork along wide trail. Some parts of the trails that have steep ascents/decents are somewhat difficult due to bald dirt trail with little to give traction. Interesting and fun foilage in parts. Able to relax on the large, beautiful beach afterwards.
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