Hayward Regional Shoreline

Hayward, California

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Hayward Regional Shoreline is a hiking and biking trail in Hayward, California. It is 1.3 miles long and begins at 16 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is a mile with a total elevation gain of 17 feet. Near the trailhead there is parking. Along the trail there is a wetland. Near the end of the trail is a bench.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Hayward Regional Shoreline is a hiking and biking trail in Hayward, California. It is 1.3 miles long and begins at 16 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is a mile with a total elevation gain of 17 feet. Near the trailhead there is parking. Along the trail there is a wetland. Near the end of the trail is a bench. This trail connects with the following: San Francisco Bay Trail.
Activity Type: Birding, Hiking, Mountain Biking, Road Biking, Trail Running
Nearby City: Hayward
Distance: 1.3
Elevation Gain: Minimal
Trailhead Elevation: 16 feet
Top Elevation: 16 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Hayward Regional Shoreline
Elevation Min/Max: 6/16 ft
Elevation Start/End: 16/16 ft
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Best Hikes with Kids: San Francisco Bay Area

Best Hikes with Kids: San Francisco Bay Area

Windswept trails along San Francisco Bay; bird- watching

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Best Easy Day Hikes: San Francisco's East Bay

Best Easy Day Hikes: San Francisco's East Bay

Narrow levees and scenic bridges support an amazing trail system that explores restored saltwater and freshwater marshes on the Hayward shoreline. Panoramic views open westward across the bay waters to San Francisco. In the mid-1800s, the pristine marshlands along the east shore of San Francisco Bay were placed into production. Levees were erected to create salt evaporation ponds—the first in the Bay Area—producing a commodity that was highly valued as a preservative for food and was also used by miners in their labors. It’s an industry that became commonplace in the East and South Bays, and many of these ponds remain today, contained in an extensive patchwork of levees that’s best appreciated from the air.

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East Bay Trails: Hiking Trails in Alameda & Contra Costa Counties

East Bay Trails: Hiking Trails in Alameda & Contra Costa Counties

From just behind the visitor center, operated by the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District, take a moment to look out over the system of marshes around you. To your left are the Oliver Ponds, remnants of a vast salt-harvesting industry that began during the mid-19th century in San Francisco Bay and still exists today in limited areas of the Bay. Four generations of the Oliver family farmed salt on the Hayward shoreline, and the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (HARD) purchased the ponds from the Oliver estate in the mid-1990s. The area directly in front of you is the HARD Marsh, former salt ponds restored to tidal action in 1986. Beyond lies the fresh and brackish water Hayward Marsh, an EBRPD project created in 1988 to naturally cleanse and release into the Bay some one million gallons per day of secondary treated sewage discharge water. To your right is habitat managed for the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse.

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Best Bike Rides San Francisco

Best Bike Rides San Francisco

The Hayward Shoreline Dig is a mercifully flat dirt and gravel ride along the shores and former salt evaporators of the San Francisco Bay’s southeast shore. The ride uses the San Francisco Bay Trail, traversing Hayward Regional Shoreline in San Lorenzo and Hayward and Eden Landing Ecological Reserve in southern Hayward.

The route is out and back, except for a couple of short loops within the boundaries of the Hayward Regional Shoreline. The only hill on the route is a short climb to the top of a freeway overpass.

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May 2018