Mount Pinos to Grouse Mountain

Frazier Park, California

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This pleasant day hike follows the crest of a high, conifer-clad mountain range south of the San Joaquin Valley.Vistas reach across the flat expanse of the San Joaquin Valley to the distant peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Mount Pinos, the high point of a major east-west ridge about 15 to 20 miles west of Tejon Pass, lies in a region where the South Coast Ranges, the Transverse Ranges, and the Tehachapi Mountains coalesce. Geologically, the Mount Pinos area is part of the South Coast Ranges. However, due to its east-west alignment, it appears to be more closely associated with the Transverse Ranges, which include the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains. The entire region is mantled in a thick conifer forest and laced with numerous trails and streams. Several trail camps throughout the Mount Pinos Ranger District beckon overnight campers. This ridgetop hike traverses the Mount Pinos high country and ends with an easy cross-country jaunt to a seldom-visited mountain covered by a thick Jeffrey pine forest. Grouse Mountain’s central location on this high ridge offers an isolated destination for city-weary hikers. Few people ascend the gentle forested slopes of this mountain, so this satisfying leg-stretcher provides an easy opportunity to enjoy nature’s solitude. Backpackers willing to carry water will find ample opportunity for camping along much of this route, though most backpackers choose to camp at Sheep Camp and Lilly Meadows along the North Fork Lockwood Creek.

Mount Pinos to Grouse Mountain Professional Review and Guide

"This pleasant day hike follows the crest of a high, conifer-clad mountain range south of the San Joaquin Valley.Vistas reach across the flat expanse of the San Joaquin Valley to the distant peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Mount Pinos, the high point of a major east-west ridge about 15 to 20 miles west of Tejon Pass, lies in a region where the South Coast Ranges, the Transverse Ranges, and the Tehachapi Mountains coalesce. Geologically, the Mount Pinos area is part of the South Coast Ranges. However, due to its east-west alignment, it appears to be more closely associated with the Transverse Ranges, which include the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains. The entire region is mantled in a thick conifer forest and laced with numerous trails and streams. Several trail camps throughout the Mount Pinos Ranger District beckon overnight campers. This ridgetop hike traverses the Mount Pinos high country and ends with an easy cross-country jaunt to a seldom-visited mountain covered by a thick Jeffrey pine forest. Grouse Mountain’s central location on this high ridge offers an isolated destination for city-weary hikers. Few people ascend the gentle forested slopes of this mountain, so this satisfying leg-stretcher provides an easy opportunity to enjoy nature’s solitude. Backpackers willing to carry water will find ample opportunity for camping along much of this route, though most backpackers choose to camp at Sheep Camp and Lilly Meadows along the North Fork Lockwood Creek."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Frazier Park
Distance: 6.6
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: 3 hours
Season: Best late May through October
Trailhead Elevation: 8,800 feet
Top Elevation: 8,800 feet
Local Contacts: Los Padres National Forest, Mount Pinos Ranger District
Local Maps: USGS Sawmill Mountain

Mount Pinos to Grouse Mountain Reviews

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8/13/2006
The driving directions are outdated. At the large parking area for Chula Vista, the road beyond is blocked off by a locked gate.
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Jun 2018