Seven Gables North Peak Direct East Face

Bishop, California

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Theodore Solomons made the first ascent of this double-summited peak with Leigh Bierce in 1894. The many buttresses on the north side of the peak inspired Solomons to give the peak its name. “The south wall of the gap we found to be the side of a peak,” wrote Solomons. “The eccentric shape of which is suggested in the name Seven Gables, which we hastened to fasten upon it. . . . We climbed the Seven Gables on the afternoon of our arrival at the head of the valley—September 20. There was a dash of snow on its chimney-like pinnacle, which must be upwards of 13,600 feet above the sea.” The most impressive features of this complex peak are the great north and northeast faces of the north peak (Peak 12,600+). This long wall is split by a series of prominent buttresses or “gables” that inspired Solomons. Vern Clevenger described their route up the center of the triangular northeast face as “probably the most significant backcountry climb that I’ve done.”

Seven Gables North Peak: Direct East Face Professional Review and Guide

"Theodore Solomons made the first ascent of this double-summited peak with Leigh Bierce in 1894. The many buttresses on the north side of the peak inspired Solomons to give the peak its name. “The south wall of the gap we found to be the side of a peak,” wrote Solomons. “The eccentric shape of which is suggested in the name Seven Gables, which we hastened to fasten upon it. . . . We climbed the Seven Gables on the afternoon of our arrival at the head of the valley—September 20. There was a dash of snow on its chimney-like pinnacle, which must be upwards of 13,600 feet above the sea.” The most impressive features of this complex peak are the great north and northeast faces of the north peak (Peak 12,600+). This long wall is split by a series of prominent buttresses or “gables” that inspired Solomons. Vern Clevenger described their route up the center of the triangular northeast face as “probably the most significant backcountry climb that I’ve done.”"

Activity Type: Climbing
Nearby City: Bishop
Class: Class 5.9 and above
Local Contacts: John Muir Wilderness
Local Maps: USGS Mt. Tom, Mt. Hilgard
Grade: Grade IV
Driving Directions: Directions to Seven Gables North Peak: Direct East Face

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May 2018