Feather Peak North Couloir

Bishop, California

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
Norman Clyde first came up with the name Feather Peak after his ascent in 1935. However, his was not the first ascent of the peak. David Brower had made the first ascent of the peak in July of 1933, scrambling up the southwest ridge. This was his first long backcountry trip. At the time, Brower had promised to name the peak after a young boy on the trip, Otis Jasper. However, Brower did not record the name and Clyde’s appellation has become official. The slabby northeast face of the peak offers an interesting technical route that was first climbed by Gary Colliver, Andy Lichtman, Ed Keller, and Mark Waller in August of 1966. To the right of the face lies a steep couloir leading to a deep gash on the north ridge. This is the Feather Couloir, one of the better snow climbs in the range, as well as a classic “extreme” ski or snowboard descent in spring or early summer. By late fall, the snow has melted, exposing the hard alpine ice underneath for those who prefer the “slippery game.”

Feather Peak: North Couloir Professional Review and Guide

"Norman Clyde first came up with the name Feather Peak after his ascent in 1935. However, his was not the first ascent of the peak. David Brower had made the first ascent of the peak in July of 1933, scrambling up the southwest ridge. This was his first long backcountry trip. At the time, Brower had promised to name the peak after a young boy on the trip, Otis Jasper. However, Brower did not record the name and Clyde’s appellation has become official. The slabby northeast face of the peak offers an interesting technical route that was first climbed by Gary Colliver, Andy Lichtman, Ed Keller, and Mark Waller in August of 1966. To the right of the face lies a steep couloir leading to a deep gash on the north ridge. This is the Feather Couloir, one of the better snow climbs in the range, as well as a classic “extreme” ski or snowboard descent in spring or early summer. By late fall, the snow has melted, exposing the hard alpine ice underneath for those who prefer the “slippery game.”"

Activity Type: Climbing
Nearby City: Bishop
Class: Class 5
Local Contacts: John Muir Wilderness
Local Maps: USGS Mt. Tom, Mt. Hilgard
Driving Directions: Directions to Feather Peak: North Couloir

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Activity Feed

May 2018