Chiricahua Wilderness Trails

Willcox, Arizona

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
The chiricahua wilderness is one of Arizona’s oldest. First established as an 18,000- acre preserve in 1933, the National Forest portion of the wilderness was expanded to 87,700 acres by the 1984 Arizona Wilderness Act. A 9,440- acre unit in the Chiricahua National Monument was set aside as wilderness in 1976, and another 850 acres in 1984. This section treats the National Forest and National Monument wilderness units as one. Named for the Chiricahua Apaches— Geronimo, Cochise, and others—who once roamed the territory, the Chiricahua range is the largest and perhaps best known of southeastern Arizona’s “sky island” mountain ranges. Lying close to the border with Mexico on the south and the continental divide on the east, the Chiricahuas provide habitat for Sierra Madrean, Rocky Mountain, eastern, and western species of plants, animals, and birds. This trail guide covers an area with more than 100 miles of trails.
Guide to Arizona's Wilderness Areas

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Guide to Arizona's Wilderness Areas

by Tom Dollar & Jerry Sieve (Westcliffe Publishers)

The chiricahua wilderness is one of Arizona’s oldest. First established as an 18,000- acre preserve in 1933, the National Forest portion of the wilderness was expanded to 87,700 acres by the 1984 Arizona Wilderness Act. A 9,440- acre unit in the Chiricahua National Monument was set aside as wilderness in 1976, and another 850 acres in 1984.

This section treats the National Forest and National Monument wilderness units as one. Named for the Chiricahua Apaches— Geronimo, Cochise, and others—who once roamed the territory, the Chiricahua range is the largest and perhaps best known of southeastern Arizona’s “sky island” mountain ranges. Lying close to the border with Mexico on the south and the continental divide on the east, the Chiricahuas provide habitat for Sierra Madrean, Rocky Mountain, eastern, and western species of plants, animals, and birds. This trail guide covers an area with more than 100 miles of trails.

©  Tom Dollar & Jerry Sieve/Westcliffe Publishers. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Willcox
Distance: 100
Trail Type: Several options
Skill Level: Moderate to Difficult
Trailhead Elevation: 5,200 feet
Top Elevation: 9,797 feet
Local Contacts: Coronado National Forest, Douglas Ranger District and National Park Service
Local Maps: USGS Rustler Park, Chiricahua Peak, Portal, Portal Peak, Fife Peak, Stanford Canyon, Swede Peak, Cochise Head
Driving Directions: Directions to Chiricahua Wilderness Trails

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Nearby Trails

Activity Feed

May 2018