Kaiser Hot Springs

Wikieup, Arizona

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2 Reviews
3 out of 5
A small concrete-and-rock tub built in an isolated, dry desert wash, fed by a small hot spring. A truly remote and pleasurable desert hot-spring experience, Kaiser is what visiting hot springs in the southwest is all about. Located along a narrow, sandy desert wash, the spring feeds a small, crude concrete-and-rock tub, built by a few hardy souls willing to cart mortar down this rough canyon. The tub is about 4 feet by 4 feet, and about 2 feet deep, with warm water (about 95 degrees F). Summer is certainly not the time to visit this hot spring, as air temperatures are likely to be well over 100 degrees F. In places the canyon is quite narrow and quite spectacular. The hike down to the spring is perhaps the most enjoyable part of the visit. At the spring, the canyon opens up a bit, allowing for a nice view of the surroundings. Although in an isolated setting, Kaiser Hot Spring is rather well known, and on weekend days in the spring, fall, and winter you can generally expect to see other people.
Touring Arizona Hot Springs

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Touring Arizona Hot Springs

by Matt C. Bischoff (Falcon Guides)

A small concrete-and-rock tub built in an isolated, dry desert wash, fed by a small hot spring. A truly remote and pleasurable desert hot-spring experience, Kaiser is what visiting hot springs in the southwest is all about. Located along a narrow, sandy desert wash, the spring feeds a small, crude concrete-and-rock tub, built by a few hardy souls willing to cart mortar down this rough canyon.

The tub is about 4 feet by 4 feet, and about 2 feet deep, with warm water (about 95 degrees F). Summer is certainly not the time to visit this hot spring, as air temperatures are likely to be well over 100 degrees F. In places the canyon is quite narrow and quite spectacular. The hike down to the spring is perhaps the most enjoyable part of the visit. At the spring, the canyon opens up a bit, allowing for a nice view of the surroundings. Although in an isolated setting, Kaiser Hot Spring is rather well known, and on weekend days in the spring, fall, and winter you can generally expect to see other people.

©  Matt C. Bischoff/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Wikieup
Season: Fall, winter, and spring. Summer is too hot.
Features: Hot Springs
Local Contacts: Bureau of Land Management
Driving Directions: Directions to Kaiser Hot Springs

Recent Trail Reviews

4/21/2009
0

I was unable to find the Hot Springs. It appears that Hwy 98 has recently undergone some rather extensive construction, and mile marker 135 is now on the edge of Kaiser Canyon -- there is no turn-out on the right (going south). I mentioned this to some other Hot Springs enthusiasts, and they said the pull out is on the opposite side of the road, just before you go over the bridge, but I haven't confirmed or debunked this yet. GOOD LUCK!


2/5/2006
0

The journey to the spring was far more interesting. The canyon was very photogenic. The water run off from the spring makes for interesting photo ops as the water runs over the rock ledges. It takes about 1.25 hr to hike to the spring from the Kaiser Bridge parking area. Things change... the makeshift concrete basin for the spring has been replaced with rocks and clay. The basin is about 15 inches deep and about 3 ft across. Just enough for a soak.



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May 2018