Page, Glen Canyon Dam, and Navajo National Monument

Page , Arizona

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A small, friendly community dedicated to tourism and electricity, Page was first staked out as a temporary government construction camp in 1957. It was named for the first commissioner of the Reclamation Service established under President Theodore Roosevelt. Since then, the town has thrived. There is a busy airport, visitors center, museum, library, and eleven churches side by side on just one street. (Two other churches are located elsewhere in town.) Near Page you’ll get your first view of Glen Canyon Dam below. Behind it, the magical blue world of Lake Powell spreads out, improbably set into a rocky abyss of this far-eastern section of the Grand Canyon. Lake Powell is renowned throughout the world for its astonishing beauty, and no tourist yet has been disappointed by the views. Just outside of Page, visitors will often find Navajo artists selling their wares. It’s fun to stop and browse and even shop. Often you can meet the artists, who are happy to describe their work to you. Navajo National Monument is a collection of three wonderfully preserved Native American ruins: all that is left of pre-Columbian communities known as Keet Seel, Betatakin (pronounced Be-tah-tah-kin), and Inscription House. Remote enough to be off the beaten tourist track and romantic, these ruins provide an unusually personal look into the past for travelers who have the stamina and time to go the distance.
Day Trips from Phoenix, Tucson, and Flagstaff

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Day Trips from Phoenix, Tucson, and Flagstaff

by Pam Hait (The Globe Pequot Press)

A small, friendly community dedicated to tourism and electricity, Page was first staked out as a temporary government construction camp in 1957. It was named for the first commissioner of the Reclamation Service established under President Theodore Roosevelt. Since then, the town has thrived. There is a busy airport, visitors center, museum, library, and eleven churches side by side on just one street. (Two other churches are located elsewhere in town.) Near Page you’ll get your first view of Glen Canyon Dam below. Behind it, the magical blue world of Lake Powell spreads out, improbably set into a rocky abyss of this far-eastern section of the Grand Canyon. Lake Powell is renowned throughout the world for its astonishing beauty, and no tourist yet has been disappointed by the views.

Just outside of Page, visitors will often find Navajo artists selling their wares. It’s fun to stop and browse and even shop. Often you can meet the artists, who are happy to describe their work to you. Navajo National Monument is a collection of three wonderfully preserved Native American ruins: all that is left of pre-Columbian communities known as Keet Seel, Betatakin (pronounced Be-tah-tah-kin), and Inscription House. Remote enough to be off the beaten tourist track and romantic, these ruins provide an unusually personal look into the past for travelers who have the stamina and time to go the distance.

©  Pam Hait/The Globe Pequot Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking
Nearby City: Page
Duration: One day to several days
Season: Year-round
Local Contacts: All contact information for attractions, dining, and lodging are provided in the eTrail.
Driving Directions: Directions to Page, Glen Canyon Dam, and Navajo National Monument

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May 2018