Flux Canyon Road

Nogales, Arizona

3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
3 out of 5
This trail passes through the Harshaw mining district, alongside many of the mines associated with the town of Harshaw. In addition, the trail travels in or above the deep canyons of Flux Canyon and Alum Gulch. The trail climbs up from Harshaw Road along Alum Gulch, past rugged, red mountain scenery. The first section of the trail passes through private property, before re-entering Coronado National Forest as it climbs toward the saddle separating Alum Gulch from Flux Canyon. This first section of the trail is easygoing, roughly graded road as it winds past the tailings piles and adits of the Blue Eagle and World’s Fair Mines, both large producers in their time. Special Attractions: Tres de Mayo Mine; Winding trail along the western edge of the Patagonia Mountains. High-clearance 4WDs are recommended, though most stock SUVs are acceptable. Expect a rough road surface with rocks larger than 6 inches, but there will be a reasonable driving line available. Patches of mud are possible but can be readily negotiated; sand may be deep and require lower tire pressures. There may be stream crossings up to 12 inches deep, substantial sections of single-lane shelf road, moderate grades, and sections of moderately loose road surface.

Flux Canyon Road Professional Review and Guide

"This trail passes through the Harshaw mining district, alongside many of the mines associated with the town of Harshaw. In addition, the trail travels in or above the deep canyons of Flux Canyon and Alum Gulch. The trail climbs up from Harshaw Road along Alum Gulch, past rugged, red mountain scenery. The first section of the trail passes through private property, before re-entering Coronado National Forest as it climbs toward the saddle separating Alum Gulch from Flux Canyon. This first section of the trail is easygoing, roughly graded road as it winds past the tailings piles and adits of the Blue Eagle and World’s Fair Mines, both large producers in their time.

Special Attractions: Tres de Mayo Mine; Winding trail along the western edge of the Patagonia Mountains. High-clearance 4WDs are recommended, though most stock SUVs are acceptable. Expect a rough road surface with rocks larger than 6 inches, but there will be a reasonable driving line available. Patches of mud are possible but can be readily negotiated; sand may be deep and require lower tire pressures. There may be stream crossings up to 12 inches deep, substantial sections of single-lane shelf road, moderate grades, and sections of moderately loose road surface."

Activity Type: Off-Highway Drives
Nearby City: Nogales
Distance: 6.9
Trail Type: Shuttle
Difficulty: Moderate
Duration: 1 hour
Season: Year-round
Trailhead Elevation: 4,000 feet
Top Elevation: 7,000 feet
Local Contacts: Coronado National Forest
Local Maps: USGS Harshaw, Cumero Canyon, Patagonia, Nogales, Fort Huachuca; BLM Nogales, Fort Huachaca, USFS Coronado National Forest, Nogales & Sierra Vista RD's
Driving Directions: Directions to Flux Canyon Road

Recent Trail Reviews

3/21/2009
0

This trail is listed in the Massey and Wilson AZ guide for stock SUVs; however, the trail has, apparently, deteriorated since their visit. A stock Jeep Wrangler maybe, although I don't know how bad the trail becomes past our stop. Soon after entering from Hwy 82, there is a narrow shelf road made up of nothing but up to 10" rocks with deep ruts. We had to back down with our Grand Cherokee (not fun). I have experience driving back trails, so stopped to walk ahead or we might have encountered serious problems getting out.


3/21/2009
0

I originally discovered this through the Backcountry Arizona Adventures book and the first time I went I had trouble finding the start of the trail. I entered the way the book suggests by starting in the main downtown area of Patagonia and driving East and South around the back side of the hill. My GPS kept trying to direct me to a road that didn't seem to exist and when I ignored that direction it still pointed inward to a way that I couldn't find. After not going far enough, and then going too far, I finally found the "Road not maintained for passenger vehicles" entrance. The entrance looks quite steep and has loose rocks but I saw a 15-passenger van from the U of A that had entered from that direction and they were making it ok although somewhat slowly. Once you get past the entrance at either side its pretty easy going and has a few side trails that can be explored and a few mines that are interesting. The end near highway 82 is much steeper, longer and more rocky than the entrance on the other side. I have done the trail 4 times, twice in each direction in our stock Jeep Wrangler.



Activity Feed

May 2018