Kachina Peaks Wilderness Trails

Flagstaff, Arizona

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For hikers the preferred times to visit the Kachina Peaks Wilderness are summer and fall. Snow begins in the higher elevations as early as October and may stay on the ground through June. Mid-June through July are the peak blooming periods for high-elevation annuals, such as Rocky Mountain iris; late September and October are the best times to see aspens turn golden. Saw-whet owl, common flicker, Western bluebird, pygmy nuthatch, chickadee, raven, Clark’s nutcracker, hermit thrush, white-throated swift, wild turkey, Steller’s jay, blue grouse, American robin, black bear, porcupine, mountain lion, gray squirrel, bobcat, elk, Abert squirrel, and deer are a few of the many birds and mammals that inhabit the Kachina Peaks Wilderness. Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are excellent within the wilderness, particularly in the Inner Basin and along the Kachina Trail. The Kachina Trail is easy to access via the Snow Bowl Ski Area. Unplowed roads leading to the Inner Basin, however, may be impassable to vehicles in winter, requiring a 4.5-mile ski or snowshoe to Lockett Meadow.
Guide to Arizona's Wilderness Areas

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Guide to Arizona's Wilderness Areas

by Tom Dollar & Jerry Sieve (Westcliffe Publishers)

For hikers the preferred times to visit the Kachina Peaks Wilderness are summer and fall. Snow begins in the higher elevations as early as October and may stay on the ground through June. Mid-June through July are the peak blooming periods for high-elevation annuals, such as Rocky Mountain iris; late September and October are the best times to see aspens turn golden. Saw-whet owl, common flicker, Western bluebird, pygmy nuthatch, chickadee, raven, Clark’s nutcracker, hermit thrush, white-throated swift, wild turkey, Steller’s jay, blue grouse, American robin, black bear, porcupine, mountain lion, gray squirrel, bobcat, elk, Abert squirrel, and deer are a few of the many birds and mammals that inhabit the Kachina Peaks Wilderness.

Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are excellent within the wilderness, particularly in the Inner Basin and along the Kachina Trail. The Kachina Trail is easy to access via the Snow Bowl Ski Area. Unplowed roads leading to the Inner Basin, however, may be impassable to vehicles in winter, requiring a 4.5-mile ski or snowshoe to Lockett Meadow.

©  Tom Dollar & Jerry Sieve/Westcliffe Publishers. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Flagstaff
Distance: 29.2
Trail Type: Several options
Skill Level: Moderate
Trailhead Elevation: 7,400 feet
Top Elevation: 12,643 feet
Local Contacts: Coconino National Forest, Peaks Ranger District
Local Maps: USGS Humphreys Peak, White Horse Hills, Sunset Crater West
Driving Directions: Directions to Kachina Peaks Wilderness Trails

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May 2018