Humphreys Peak Trail

Flagstaff, Arizona

3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars3 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
3 out of 5
This popular hike takes you to the highest summit in Arizona, which is in the Kachina Peaks Wilderness. On a clear day the views are, well, incredible. Note that cross-country hiking is prohibited by the USDA Forest Service above 11,400 feet on San Francisco Mountain. Above timberline, you must stay on the trail. This trail was built in 1985 and is not shown on the topographic map. The trail starts near the base of a chair lift in upper Hart Prairie and crosses into the forest on the north side of the meadow. The trail ascends in a series of long but well-graded switchbacks through the dense forest. At first, the forest is a mixture of ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and quaking aspen trees associated with the Canadian life zone. These give way to limber pine and Englemann spruce in the higher sections of the forest. Near timberline, the forest is mostly subalpine fir, Arizona corkbark fir, and bristlecone pine, which represents the classic subalpine life zone.

Humphreys Peak Trail Professional Review and Guide

"This popular hike takes you to the highest summit in Arizona, which is in the Kachina Peaks Wilderness. On a clear day the views are, well, incredible. Note that cross-country hiking is prohibited by the USDA Forest Service above 11,400 feet on San Francisco Mountain. Above timberline, you must stay on the trail. This trail was built in 1985 and is not shown on the topographic map. The trail starts near the base of a chair lift in upper Hart Prairie and crosses into the forest on the north side of the meadow. The trail ascends in a series of long but well-graded switchbacks through the dense forest.

At first, the forest is a mixture of ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and quaking aspen trees associated with the Canadian life zone. These give way to limber pine and Englemann spruce in the higher sections of the forest. Near timberline, the forest is mostly subalpine fir, Arizona corkbark fir, and bristlecone pine, which represents the classic subalpine life zone."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Flagstaff
Distance: 8.8
Elevation Gain: 3,330 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Difficult
Duration: 6 hours
Season: Best summer through fall
Trailhead Elevation: 9,300 feet
Top Elevation: 12,633 feet
Local Contacts: Peaks Ranger District, Coconino National Forest
Local Maps: USGS Humphreys Peak; Coconino National Forest
Driving Directions: Directions to Humphreys Peak Trail

Recent Trail Reviews

5/19/2007
0

Coming from the east coast the altitude was harder than I expected. After the 11,400 elevation sign the trail was steep, rocky and hard, at times after the saddle it was rock crawling and the trail was hard to follow. If it had not been for the trail "posts" I would have taken more wrong turns than I did, but the summit was worth the effort.


6/10/2001
1

The trail starts at the bottom Snowbowl Ski Area parking lot. Beware the parking lot will be full in the summer. We camped in the grass beside the trailhead, and woke up early to start our quest for the highest point in AZ. It's nearly impossible to get lost on this "superhighway" that runs up the mountain. There seemed to be people everywhere. The views were quite spectacular from the saddle and again from the summit. Unfortunately the summit was swarming with an unbelievable amount of black bugs (they didn't bite). It wasn't unusual to have more than 100 bugs on you at any one time. I personally did not particularly enjoy this hike due to the extremely high traffic that I found on the trail. If you like company and don't mind sharing a trail with 100 or so people (most not prepared for any foul weather) than this could be a great place for a rather challenging hike.



Trail Photos

Nearby Trails

Activity Feed

May 2018