Freidlein Prairie Trail

Flagstaff, Arizona

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1 Review
4 out of 5
This short trail is one of only a few smaller trails that travel the southern side of the San Francisco Peaks, which at 12,643 feet are the highest mountains in Arizona and part of the San Francisco Volcanic Field. The towering San Francisco Mountains are sacred to many Indian tribes and are known by several names. To the Navajo, they are Dok’o’sliid, “the sacred mountain of the west.” The Hopi name is Nuvateekia- ovi, “the place of snow on the very top.” The Hopi believe that their gods (kachinas) live on the peaks for part of each year and that they bring rain to the mesa area where the Hopi live. Special Attractions: Small trail that winds around the flank of the San Francisco Peaks; Spring wildflowers and splashes of golden aspens in the fall. High-clearance 4WDs are preferred, but any high-clearance vehicle is acceptable. Expect a rough road surface; mud and sand are possible but will be easily passable. You may encounter rocks up to 6 inches in diameter, a loose road surface, and shelf roads, though these will be wide enough for passing or will have adequate pull-offs.

Freidlein Prairie Trail Professional Review and Guide

"This short trail is one of only a few smaller trails that travel the southern side of the San Francisco Peaks, which at 12,643 feet are the highest mountains in Arizona and part of the San Francisco Volcanic Field. The towering San Francisco Mountains are sacred to many Indian tribes and are known by several names. To the Navajo, they are Dok’o’sliid, “the sacred mountain of the west.” The Hopi name is Nuvateekia- ovi, “the place of snow on the very top.” The Hopi believe that their gods (kachinas) live on the peaks for part of each year and that they bring rain to the mesa area where the Hopi live.

Special Attractions: Small trail that winds around the flank of the San Francisco Peaks; Spring wildflowers and splashes of golden aspens in the fall. High-clearance 4WDs are preferred, but any high-clearance vehicle is acceptable. Expect a rough road surface; mud and sand are possible but will be easily passable. You may encounter rocks up to 6 inches in diameter, a loose road surface, and shelf roads, though these will be wide enough for passing or will have adequate pull-offs."

Activity Type: Off-Highway Drives
Nearby City: Flagstaff
Distance: 6.4
Trail Type: Shuttle
Difficulty: Moderate
Duration: 45 minutes
Season: March to late November
Trailhead Elevation: 8,000 feet
Top Elevation: 8,700 feet
Local Contacts: Coconino National Forest
Local Maps: USGS Humphreys Peak, Flagstaff; BLM Flagstaff; USFS Coconino National Forest, Peaks Ranger District
Driving Directions: Directions to Freidlein Prairie Trail

Recent Trail Reviews

9/18/2011
0

The first 5 miles of the trail is just a dirt road with dispersed camping sites flanking it every half mile or so. The final mile is where things get fun. There's a switchback with a trailhead that goes up the backside of Agassiz peak, and the road just goes to hell. There's tons of rocks and washed out ditches to cross through, at one point we got the Jeep on 3 wheels. Eventually the road ends but you're rewarded with a giant mud puddle to crash through at the end if there's been recent rain. Pretty fun trail to go out on if you're looking for a short drive.



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May 2018