Little Missouri River Albert Pike Campground to US 70 Bridge

Langley, Arkansas

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2 Reviews
4 out of 5
The Little Missouri River begins in the Caney Creek Wildlife Management Area and flows southeast to Greeson Lake. The river cuts through the Ouachita Mountains, creating the spectacular Little Missouri Falls near its headwaters and class II, III, and occasionally IV rapids below. Besides the rapids, there’s dramatic scenery in store for paddlers due to the remoteness of the river and the geology of the Ouachita Mountains. The Little Missouri River is for experienced paddlers comfortable in class III whitewater and able to negotiate large standing waves. The river is more technical than most in the state, requiring complex maneuvers in many of the rapids. The canoe run begins at Albert Pike Campground, except in periods of very high water when paddlers can put-in at numerous spots along FR 73. Be cautious of downed trees and numerous willow jungles if you attempt the upper reaches of the Little Missouri. The area surrounding Albert Pike is lined with vacation homes, mostly on river right, for approximately a mile below the put-in. Below this section the river is very fast and narrow, dropping through several willow-lined chutes with good standing waves. It then widens slightly, and the stark bluffs of the Ouachitas and the pine forests typical of this region greet paddlers. Water quality on the Little Missouri is the best the author has experienced in the Ozark or Ouachita Mountains.
A Canoeing & Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks

DESCRIPTION FROM:

A Canoeing & Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks

by Tom Kennon (Menasha Ridge Press)

The Little Missouri River begins in the Caney Creek Wildlife Management Area and flows southeast to Greeson Lake. The river cuts through the Ouachita Mountains, creating the spectacular Little Missouri Falls near its headwaters and class II, III, and occasionally IV rapids below. Besides the rapids, there’s dramatic scenery in store for paddlers due to the remoteness of the river and the geology of the Ouachita Mountains. The Little Missouri River is for experienced paddlers comfortable in class III whitewater and able to negotiate large standing waves. The river is more technical than most in the state, requiring complex maneuvers in many of the rapids.

The canoe run begins at Albert Pike Campground, except in periods of very high water when paddlers can put-in at numerous spots along FR 73. Be cautious of downed trees and numerous willow jungles if you attempt the upper reaches of the Little Missouri. The area surrounding Albert Pike is lined with vacation homes, mostly on river right, for approximately a mile below the put-in. Below this section the river is very fast and narrow, dropping through several willow-lined chutes with good standing waves. It then widens slightly, and the stark bluffs of the Ouachitas and the pine forests typical of this region greet paddlers. Water quality on the Little Missouri is the best the author has experienced in the Ozark or Ouachita Mountains.

©  Tom Kennon/Menasha Ridge Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Whitewater Kayaking & Canoeing
Nearby City: Langley
Distance: 20
Duration: 2 sections range from 4 to 6.4 hours
Class: Class II-IV
Local Contacts: Carrey Creek Wildlife Management Area
Local Maps: USGS Athens
Driving Directions: Directions to Little Missouri River: Albert Pike Campground to US 70 Bridge

Recent Trail Reviews

3/18/2015
0

Started this trail in an attempt to do the Eagle Rock loop. When I got to the 16 mile point, which is the end of the Little Missouri trail, the rainfall had created some unsafe river crossings to do alone. I then just walked back using a combination of roads and trail. 29 miles in a day and a half of hiking. Overall it was very nice. The trail is somewhat difficult to follow in spots, but there was plenty of good drinking water. I plan to revisit and do this the full Eagle Rock Loop.


8/12/2005
0

no water to speak of, but the pools were fun to swim in



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May 2018