Gazebo Trail

Atmore, Alabama

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The first sign of any elevation gain in the hikes of the Gulf Coast region of Alabama occurs in Claude D. Kelley State Park. Here the Gazebo Trail travels up the shallow inclines of 300-foot ridges past slash pines towering over pine needle floors. The trail crosses several creeks and streams that feed Blacksher Lake. Along the way, look for small fern forests, as well as Eastern wild turkeys, white-tailed deer, and red-tailed hawks. Trail Surface: Dirt and sand trails; dirt and gravel road. Tucked away like a little secret off AL 21 is Claude D. Kelley State Park, yet another gift of the Depression era’s Civilian Conservation Corps program. The centerpieceof the 960-acre park is Blacksher Lake.

Gazebo Trail Professional Review and Guide

"The first sign of any elevation gain in the hikes of the Gulf Coast region of Alabama occurs in Claude D. Kelley State Park. Here the Gazebo Trail travels up the shallow inclines of 300-foot ridges past slash pines towering over pine needle floors. The trail crosses several creeks and streams that feed Blacksher Lake.

Along the way, look for small fern forests, as well as Eastern wild turkeys, white-tailed deer, and red-tailed hawks. Trail Surface: Dirt and sand trails; dirt and gravel road. Tucked away like a little secret off AL 21 is Claude D. Kelley State Park, yet another gift of the Depression era’s Civilian Conservation Corps program. The centerpieceof the 960-acre park is Blacksher Lake."

Activity Type: Hiking, Horseback Riding
Nearby City: Atmore
Distance: 3.2
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Easy to Moderate
Duration: 1.5 hours
Season: Open year-round
Trailhead Elevation: 190 feet
Top Elevation: 330 feet
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Local Contacts: Claude D. Kelley State Park
Local Maps: USGS Uriah East
Driving Directions: Directions to Gazebo Trail

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May 2018