Pinnel Mountain

Fairbanks, Alaska

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4 Reviews
5 out of 5
This trail travels along a ridgeline, with spectacular panoramic views, wildlife, and wildflowers, and one of the top longer hikes in the region. The premier long hike in the Fairbanks area, the Pinnell Mountain Trail is a National Recreation Trail for good reason. It traverses the highest ridge in the area, so it offers nearly continuous panoramic views as well as wildlife and wildflowers.
Hiking Alaska: A Guide to Alaska's Greatest Hiking Adventures

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking Alaska: A Guide to Alaska's Greatest Hiking Adventures

by Mollie Foster (Falcon Guides)

This trail travels along a ridgeline, with spectacular panoramic views, wildlife, and wildflowers, and one of the top longer hikes in the region.

The premier long hike in the Fairbanks area, the Pinnell Mountain Trail is a National Recreation Trail for good reason. It traverses the highest ridge in the area, so it offers nearly continuous panoramic views as well as wildlife and wildflowers.

© 2017 Mollie Foster/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Fairbanks
Distance: 27.3
Elevation Gain: 6,000 feet
Trail Type: Point-to-Point
Skill Level: Difficult
Season: Best June to mid-Sep
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Local Contacts: Bureau of Land Management, Northern Field Office, 222 University Ave., Fairbanks, AK 99709; 907-474-2200; https://www.blm.gov/alaska; https://www.blm.gov/visit/pinnell-mountain-trail
Local Maps: USGS Circle B-3, B-4, C-3, and C-4; BLM brochure Pinnell Mountain National Recreation Trail
Driving Directions: Directions to Pinnel Mountain

Recent Trail Reviews

7/22/2012
1

Let it be known that legendary male backcountry of the 2012 alaska trip finished the Pinnel trail during the 24th hour. MARBLES


8/11/2006
1

This is the land that made my wife fall in love with Alaska. Some spectacular views and wonderful silence. Went for a day hike from the 12 Mile Summit end during mid May. The plank path was still present and a number had been recently replaced. A moderate amount of snow still present but a lot of water due to the melt. Well worth the drive and effort. Saw a Blue Fox, porcupine, and of course moose on the trip up. Going back next year and I live in Alabama.


5/25/2003
0

May I recommend _not_ doing this trail in May while there's still snow on the ground ;). Although we had no problems with mosquitoes, and didn't see another person all three days (the last people through were on snow shoes in Feb.) we ended up hiking through patches of thigh-deep snow (crash, boom through the crust). The scenary is spectacular, though, and we saw a fox and multiple ptarmagin. The wind can be really nasty (I actually got blown over) but the camp sites are (relatively) out of the wind. We successfully hitched a ride back, but it took 2 hours and multiple people passed us by.


7/4/2001
0

After working with an American Trails Society work party on maintaining and improving both ends of this trail for ten days, it was time to go for an Independence Day stroll and experience the trail in its entirety. I started out from the Eagle Summit end and was quickly enveloped in the clouds by the time I reached the top of the first set of switchbacks. My commitment was to meet the driver who was to pick me up at the other end of the trail (Twelve Mile Summit) twelve hours (and twenty seven miles) later. At times the clouds would lift sufficiently to reveal panoramic views of soaring ridgelines and deep valleys. At other times the encircling cloud and hustling wind made me focus up close on the trail immediately at my feet and the flowers blooming in the tundra through which the trail passes. In places the trail crossed soggy tundra, in others it crossed dry tundra on wind swept ridge tops, and everywhere it traversed above the tree line, so the potential for distant views was always there. Navigation along the trail was problematic at times when in the cloud, as no visible trace of a tread exists on several of the high ridge lines, and trail markers are placed sufficiently far apart that it is not possible to see even one fourth of the distance from one marker to the next under cloud-shrouded conditions. On the other extreme for required route finding skills, the hiker encounters a continuous board plank walk more than a mile in length down one side of a saddle where the tundra is particularly wet, and up the other. The Pinnell Mountain NRT provides the hiker with an extremely rewarding ridge-line experience, whether day hiking it as I did or taking the usual three days to backpack it. But, no matter what month it might be, the wise hiker should be prepared for any kind of severe weather. My colleagues, who left Eagle Summit at the same time as I, but were backpacking the trail, came down to Twelve Mile Summit two days later in a snowstorm, with the snow being driven horizontally! Central Alaska is a beautiful land!!



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Activity Feed

May 2018