Space Needle Cloud Viewing

Seattle, Washington

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Before dismissing the Space Needle as tourist territory, consider its prime location and panoramic views akin to those of a fire lookout on an alpine peak. Tall, built structures like these are some of the few places in the city that afford perspective on the land- and waterscapes that define this region. With good visibility, the 360-degree perimeter offers unobstructed views of Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, the Olympic, and Cascade Ranges—and all of the weather churning in between. As the elevator ascends to the Observation Deck traveling 800 feet per minute (10 miles per hour) you are rising about as fast as a cumulus cloud—those gently billowing masses that so often punctuate the blue skies of spring. Although a trip to the top of the Needle—520 feet above the ground—is thrilling any time of year, March, April, and May offer some of the best sky viewing. During spring, the differences in temperature between the rapidly warming earth and the still wintry upper atmosphere make for some of the most interesting cloud days. The temperature differences also churn away smog, improving visibility.
Nature in the City: Seattle

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Nature in the City: Seattle

by Maria Dolan & Kathryn True (The Mountaineers Books)

Before dismissing the Space Needle as tourist territory, consider its prime location and panoramic views akin to those of a fire lookout on an alpine peak. Tall, built structures like these are some of the few places in the city that afford perspective on the land- and waterscapes that define this region. With good visibility, the 360-degree perimeter offers unobstructed views of Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, the Olympic, and Cascade Ranges—and all of the weather churning in between.

As the elevator ascends to the Observation Deck traveling 800 feet per minute (10 miles per hour) you are rising about as fast as a cumulus cloud—those gently billowing masses that so often punctuate the blue skies of spring. Although a trip to the top of the Needle—520 feet above the ground—is thrilling any time of year, March, April, and May offer some of the best sky viewing. During spring, the differences in temperature between the rapidly warming earth and the still wintry upper atmosphere make for some of the most interesting cloud days. The temperature differences also churn away smog, improving visibility.

©  Maria Dolan & Kathryn True/The Mountaineers Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Nature Trips
Nearby City: Seattle
Season: Year-round
Driving Directions: Directions to Space Needle: Cloud Viewing

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Apr 2018