Scotts Bluff National Monument

Scottsbluff, Nebraska

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1 Review
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Named for a local fur trapper, Scotts Bluff National Monument was established primarily for its historic importance as a prominent landmark along the Oregon Trail for westward-bound pioneers. The escarpment, which rises 800 feet above the valley of the North Platte River (elevation above sea level is 4,649 feet), provides the most dramatic scenery in all of Nebraska. The hard sandstone, of which the escarpment is composed, has prevented it from eroding to the level of the surrounding plain. No matter which direction you approach it from, Scotts Bluff rises majestically above the land around it and is both beautiful and impressive.
Great American Wilderness: Touring America's National Parks

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Great American Wilderness: Touring America's National Parks

by Larry H. Ludmer (Hunter Publishing)

Named for a local fur trapper, Scotts Bluff National Monument was established primarily for its historic importance as a prominent landmark along the Oregon Trail for westward-bound pioneers. The escarpment, which rises 800 feet above the valley of the North Platte River (elevation above sea level is 4,649 feet), provides the most dramatic scenery in all of Nebraska.

The hard sandstone, of which the escarpment is composed, has prevented it from eroding to the level of the surrounding plain. No matter which direction you approach it from, Scotts Bluff rises majestically above the land around it and is both beautiful and impressive.

©  Larry H. Ludmer/Hunter Publishing. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Scenic Drives
Nearby City: Scottsbluff
Season: Year-round, best spring through fall
Local Contacts: Contact information for the park, accommodations, and dining are included in the eTrail.
Driving Directions: Directions to Scotts Bluff National Monument

Recent Trail Reviews

6/17/2004
0

My wife and I hike down from the top of the bluff back to the park headquarters building. The weather was bright and sunny; the sandstone cliffs were awe inspiring with the scenery around the Platte River stretching north and east. The first 2/3 of the hike was the decent from the rock to the prairie. And the final leg across the prairie back to the office. This last section made us appreciate the struggles encountered by the Oregon Trail travelers of the 18th century who used this rock structure for one of their trail markers. We had a nice time, and were very happy we rode to the top in the park supplied shuttle van and made the hike downhill.



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Apr 2018