La Conner, WA

La Conner, Washington

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Tiny La Conner has more to offer the visitor than many towns ten times its size. Located on Swinomish Channel, it began as a trading post in 1867 and was known then as Swinomish. In 1869, John and Louisa Anne Conner bought the trading post and established a post office. John named the town after his wife by joining her first two initials to their last name. Settlers ditched, diked, and drained thousands of acres of Skagit River delta and adjacent wetlands to create some of the most fertile farmlands in the world. Bumper crops of grain and hay turned La Conner into a thriving shipping center. Fishing, freight, and farming attracted people to the area, until La Conner residents numbered about 1,000 by the early 1900s. The town flourished until the arrival of railroads in the Pacific Northwest. Each spring, nearby fields become the stuff of artists’ and photographers’ dreams, as bulb farmers’ crops of tulips and daffodils bloom, transforming acre upon acre into scenes worthy of canvas and Kodachrome. The charming community is now a year-round attraction and one of the most popular spots in the Northwest. About 75 percent of the businesses are engaged in retail, food, and lodging enterprises. Summers, of course, are bumper-to-bumper busy, but autumn also draws Christmas shoppers to the many interesting and unusual shops.
Driving the Pacific Coast: Oregon & Washington

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Driving the Pacific Coast: Oregon & Washington

by Kathy Strong (Editor) (Insiders' Guide)

Tiny La Conner has more to offer the visitor than many towns ten times its size. Located on Swinomish Channel, it began as a trading post in 1867 and was known then as Swinomish. In 1869, John and Louisa Anne Conner bought the trading post and established a post office. John named the town after his wife by joining her first two initials to their last name. Settlers ditched, diked, and drained thousands of acres of Skagit River delta and adjacent wetlands to create some of the most fertile farmlands in the world. Bumper crops of grain and hay turned La Conner into a thriving shipping center. Fishing, freight, and farming attracted people to the area, until La Conner residents numbered about 1,000 by the early 1900s. The town flourished until the arrival of railroads in the Pacific Northwest.

Each spring, nearby fields become the stuff of artists’ and photographers’ dreams, as bulb farmers’ crops of tulips and daffodils bloom, transforming acre upon acre into scenes worthy of canvas and Kodachrome. The charming community is now a year-round attraction and one of the most popular spots in the Northwest. About 75 percent of the businesses are engaged in retail, food, and lodging enterprises. Summers, of course, are bumper-to-bumper busy, but autumn also draws Christmas shoppers to the many interesting and unusual shops.

© 2006 Kathy Strong (Editor)/Insiders' Guide. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: La Conner
Season: Year-round
Local Contacts: Contact information for all attractions is provided in the eTrail
Driving Directions: Directions to La Conner, WA

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Apr 2018