W G Jones State Forest

Conroe, Texas

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This 1,725-acre state forest was named for W. Goodrich Jones, the “Father of Forestry” in Texas. Primarily a native loblolly pine forest, it is managed as a “demonstration forest” to test various forest management techniques, forest genetics, and forest product utilization. Prescribed fires are set annually, and the mature pine areas are burned once every three to five years. The self-guided Sweetleaf Nature Trail is located in the northwest corner of the forest; it serves as an ideal classroom for learning about typical flora and fauna of southeast Texas. Key birds: Wood Duck; Red-headed, Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy, Redcockaded, and Pileated Woodpeckers; and Brown-headed Nuthatch are present year-round. Chuck-will’s-widow; Wood Thrush; Wormeating, Swainson’s, Kentucky, and Hooded Warblers; Louisiana Waterthrush; and Indigo and Painted Buntings occur in summer. American Woodcock; Sedge Wren; and Henslow’s, LeConte’s, Fox, and Harris’s Sparrows can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.
Birding Texas

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Birding Texas

by Roland H. Wauer & Mark A. Elwonger (Falcon Guides)

This 1,725-acre state forest was named for W. Goodrich Jones, the “Father of Forestry” in Texas. Primarily a native loblolly pine forest, it is managed as a “demonstration forest” to test various forest management techniques, forest genetics, and forest product utilization. Prescribed fires are set annually, and the mature pine areas are burned once every three to five years. The self-guided Sweetleaf Nature Trail is located in the northwest corner of the forest; it serves as an ideal classroom for learning about typical flora and fauna of southeast Texas.

Key birds: Wood Duck; Red-headed, Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy, Redcockaded, and Pileated Woodpeckers; and Brown-headed Nuthatch are present year-round. Chuck-will’s-widow; Wood Thrush; Wormeating, Swainson’s, Kentucky, and Hooded Warblers; Louisiana Waterthrush; and Indigo and Painted Buntings occur in summer. American Woodcock; Sedge Wren; and Henslow’s, LeConte’s, Fox, and Harris’s Sparrows can usually be found in winter. This eTrail provides detailed information on birding strategies for this specific location, the specialty birds and other key birds you might see, directions to each birding spot, a detailed map, and helpful general information.

©  Roland H. Wauer & Mark A. Elwonger/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Birding
Nearby City: Conroe
Trail Type: Several options
Best Times: Best April and May for spring migrants and nesting activity
Local Contacts: Texas Forest Service
Local Maps: Texas Atlas & Gazetteer, DeLorme
Topo Map: W. G. Jones State Forest Topographic Map
Guide Book: Birding Texas Guide Book
Driving Directions: View Directions
Trail Directions: View Guide

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Recent Trail Reviews

1/2/2018

Middle Lake, Deep Gully and Gravel Pit trails. The trails are very well maintained and well marked. These are very easy, flat trails. We saw a red cockaded woodpecker, an endangered bird species that has a colony in the W.G. Jones State Forest. Parking off FM 1488 is convenient to the trailhead. There are no services, no water and no restrooms at the parking area. There is a ranger station on FM 1488 east of the parking area. The drawback is that because there are no garbage or waste receptacles at the parking area, there are numerous plastic bags of dog poop left trailside or in the parking area.

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