Albert F Norris Reservation

Norwell, Massachusetts

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
Tom Foster, district supervisor for the Trustees of Reservations, referred to the Norris Reservation as a “jewel.” He’s right; the trails lead from heavily forested land to the banks of the historic North River, an estuarial river that winds its way through an incredibly scenic salt marsh. Highlights: Walk to river, pond, holly trees. From the parking lot a wide, well-groomed trail passes a small millpond where a gristmill and sawmill were built in 1690. Canada geese are often seen paddling about the shallow pond. Second Herring Brook exits the pond on the right, and there are comfortable benches situated by both the side of the brook and the pond itself. In 1992 a new trail was added to the reservation. It forks to the left just after the millpond and soon joins an old woods road that leads down to the river where there is an old, but well-kept, boathouse. The trail is about a half-mile long. I still prefer the original trail, which forms a loop, first leading from the millpond and paralleling Second Herring Brook. Where the trail forks, stay to the right. It passes beneath large white pines, maples, oaks, and a scattering of beech.
Nature Walks in Eastern Massachusetts

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Nature Walks in Eastern Massachusetts

by Michael Tougias (Appalachian Mountain Club Books)

Tom Foster, district supervisor for the Trustees of Reservations, referred to the Norris Reservation as a “jewel.” He’s right; the trails lead from heavily forested land to the banks of the historic North River, an estuarial river that winds its way through an incredibly scenic salt marsh. Highlights: Walk to river, pond, holly trees.

From the parking lot a wide, well-groomed trail passes a small millpond where a gristmill and sawmill were built in 1690. Canada geese are often seen paddling about the shallow pond. Second Herring Brook exits the pond on the right, and there are comfortable benches situated by both the side of the brook and the pond itself. In 1992 a new trail was added to the reservation. It forks to the left just after the millpond and soon joins an old woods road that leads down to the river where there is an old, but well-kept, boathouse. The trail is about a half-mile long. I still prefer the original trail, which forms a loop, first leading from the millpond and paralleling Second Herring Brook. Where the trail forks, stay to the right. It passes beneath large white pines, maples, oaks, and a scattering of beech.

©  Michael Tougias/Appalachian Mountain Club Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Walking
Nearby City: Norwell
Distance: 2
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 1 hour
Season: Best spring thru fall
Accessibility: Kid-friendly
Local Contacts: Trustees of Reservations
Driving Directions: Directions to Albert F. Norris Reservation

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Keep Me Informed

Weekly newsletters, announcements and offers from Trails.com to your inbox.

Sign me up!

We HATE spam and promise to keep your email addresses safe and secure.

Activity Feed

Apr 2018