Cedar Butte

North Bend, Washington

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2 Reviews
2 out of 5
Cedar Butte may be the least visited mountain in the Snoqualmie Pass corridor. The smallish butte stands between the popular Rattlesnake Lake and the remote Chester Morse Lake in the Cedar River watershed area. This butte’s lack of popularity, though, has more to do with its lack of publicity than its dearth of scenery. Indeed, Cedar Butte offers plenty of scenic spectacle.
Day Hiking: Snoqualmie Region

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Day Hiking: Snoqualmie Region

by Dan A. Nelson (The Mountaineers Books)

Cedar Butte may be the least visited mountain in the Snoqualmie Pass corridor. The smallish butte stands between the popular Rattlesnake Lake and the remote Chester Morse Lake in the Cedar River watershed area. This butte’s lack of popularity, though, has more to do with its lack of publicity than its dearth of scenery. Indeed, Cedar Butte offers plenty of scenic spectacle.

© 2014 Dan A. Nelson/The Mountaineers Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: North Bend
Distance: 5
Elevation Gain: 900 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate
Season: Year-round
Accessibility: Dog-friendly, Kid-friendly
Local Contacts: Washington State Parks
Local Maps: Green Trails Rattlesnake Mountain 205S
Driving Directions: Directions to Cedar Butte

Recent Trail Reviews

6/23/2009
0

A quiet little hike 30 minutes from downtown Seattle. It's a great break in for early in the season. Second growth timber with a few scenic openings. Mid way through the hike you moss covered maple and fur. The lower story growth is twisted into fantastic shapes and glows emerald green in the sunlight. The mosquitoes were just starting to swarm in late June so bring the bug juice. Read up on the Boxley Creek Blow Out before you go and the the section of the trail that skirts the ridge above the blow out makes more sense. http://www.historylink.org/essays/output.cfm?file_id=2426 Great hike for a beginner and for a new pair of boots.


8/23/2008
0

To get to this trail you have to walk for a while on Iron Goat Trail which is kind of dirt/biking road. There are no signs for trail head. You will just see slim little trail forking off in to bushes Iron Goat Trail. The bush and scrubs on this trail is REALLY overgrown (in late summer). You will be literally brushing through them almost all the way. During summer months the trail is also buzzing with insects and will hover your sweaty head almost all the way. There are no views along the trail. At the top one side of the butte opens up and you can see some views but not panoramic and nothing compared to what you can see on Rattlesnake Ledge. In short: lot of bushwhacking, insects and not much of views.



Activity Feed

Apr 2018