OO Denny Park

Kirkland, Washington

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3 Reviews
4 out of 5
At O. O. Denny Park, nothing is as it seems. What looks like a small, lakefront green space in the city of Kirkland is actually a narrow slice of deep forest owned by the city of Seattle. Some of the largest trees in the city stand here, including the broken-off trunk of a 600-year-old Douglas fir, reportedly the largest tree in King County until high winds felled it in the early 1990s. An easy trail loops through the narrow creek valley. O. O. Denny Park is largely known for its beach—if it is known at all. Drawn by the open picnic area right on Lake Washington, families arrive on hot summer weekends to relax, play, and have barbecues on the grass. A large wooden shelter is often reserved for formal occasions and large gatherings, and 0.25 mile of access to the water provides good views of the opposite shore, including the enormous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) installation at Sand Point to the south.
60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Seattle - Including Bellevue, Everett, and Tacoma

DESCRIPTION FROM:

60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Seattle - Including Bellevue, Everett, and Tacoma

by Andrew Weber and Bryce Stevens (Menasha Ridge Press)

At O. O. Denny Park, nothing is as it seems. What looks like a small, lakefront green space in the city of Kirkland is actually a narrow slice of deep forest owned by the city of Seattle. Some of the largest trees in the city stand here, including the broken-off trunk of a 600-year-old Douglas fir, reportedly the largest tree in King County until high winds felled it in the early 1990s. An easy trail loops through the narrow creek valley.

O. O. Denny Park is largely known for its beach—if it is known at all. Drawn by the open picnic area right on Lake Washington, families arrive on hot summer weekends to relax, play, and have barbecues on the grass. A large wooden shelter is often reserved for formal occasions and large gatherings, and 0.25 mile of access to the water provides good views of the opposite shore, including the enormous National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) installation at Sand Point to the south.

© 2016 Andrew Weber and Bryce Stevens/Menasha Ridge Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Kirkland
Distance: 1
Elevation Gain: 200 feet
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: 1 to 2 hours
Season: Hikable year-round, daily, sunrise–sunset
Accessibility: Dog-friendly
Local Contacts: 425-587-3300; tinyurl.com/oodennypark
Local Maps: USGS Bellevue North
Driving Directions: Directions to O.O. Denny Park

Recent Trail Reviews

3/10/2018
1

This was a really nice, fairly low-impact hike. We were pleasantly surprised with how beautiful it was. The trees are huge and the stream running through the gully is lovely. We enjoyed the points of interest and we headed over to the lake front to eat our lunch, with a full view of Mt Rainier in front of us. A really great little break from the city without having to drive much at all!


7/7/2007
1

I live in Kirkland and had never heard of this place...HUGE HUGE HUGE trees and a great little hike and a wonderful surprise.


5/28/2007
0

I only found a very short loop trail around the stream where they have created a natural looking salmon ladder. The lakeshore at this park is a lovely picnic spot.



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Apr 2018