Cleman Mountain

Naches, Washington

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1 Review
4 out of 5
Cleman Mountain, a 15-mile-long ridge formed of Columbia Basin lava flows more than 10 million years ago, was named in 1868 for settler Augustan Cleman. It rises to an elevation of nearly 5,000 feet, some 3,000 feet above Naches and Nile valleys (to the west) and Wenas Valley (to the east). On a clear day it provides grand vistas from the forested Cascades, including Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams, to the rolling, semiarid Columbia Basin. On roads that range from graded dirt and gravel to rough, loose rock. High ground clearance will be required.
Washington Byways

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Washington Byways

by Tony Huegel (Wilderness Press)

Cleman Mountain, a 15-mile-long ridge formed of Columbia Basin lava flows more than 10 million years ago, was named in 1868 for settler Augustan Cleman. It rises to an elevation of nearly 5,000 feet, some 3,000 feet above Naches and Nile valleys (to the west) and Wenas Valley (to the east).

On a clear day it provides grand vistas from the forested Cascades, including Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams, to the rolling, semiarid Columbia Basin. On roads that range from graded dirt and gravel to rough, loose rock. High ground clearance will be required.

©  Tony Huegel/Wilderness Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Off-Highway Drives
Nearby City: Naches
Distance: 19
Trail Type: Shuttle
Difficulty: Easy
Duration: 1.5 hours or more for exploring road network
Local Contacts: Wenatchee National Forest, Naches Ranger District; Washington Department of Natural Resources
Local Maps: Washington Road & Recreation Atlas; Wenatchee National Forest, South Half
Driving Directions: Directions to Cleman Mountain

Recent Trail Reviews

9/8/2012
0

This 4x4 trial is almost entirely on fractured rock and can at times be slow going. It takes you up the ridgeline to a former forest fire lookout that is now a high tech communications site with multiple towers and unmanned support buildings. Use caution at the many intersections as a lot of the roads are seasonally closed for the different game herds that graze in the area. We elected to return via a different trail and came down Milk Canyon Road to the Wenas road on the north side of the ridge, the DNR forestry gate at the bottom was locked when we got there and luckily local ranchers had just arrived to investigate fire reports from the lightning storm the night before and they opened the gate. This gate is not supposed to be locked and they locked it open saving us a 25 mile retracing of our track. The trail guide lists a number of informational signs along the way, the sign boards are still there but the signs have been long weathered and gone away. The views of the valley are enough to distract the driver so take time to get out and look around. Traffic on the trail was very light with only a couple trucks and motorcycles passed in the hours we were on the trail.



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