Timberline Trail Loop Backpacking

Government Camp, Oregon

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7 Reviews
4 out of 5
The Timberline Trail circling Mount Hood is probably the most famous footpath in the state. Guidebooks describing the finest hiking trails in the nation often include this spectacular route, so Oregonians must share the trail with people from all over the country (and even international travelers). Even before the official trail was built by CCC workers in the 1930s, this round-the-mountain tour had many admirers—and justifiably so. The mountain views are stunning, wildflowers choke the meadows, and exceptional side trips abound. The enormous trail population is dominated by dayhikers, who have access to every corner of the mountain. The Forest Service is currently proposing to restrict the numbers of hikers and campsites—an unfortunate but probably necessary step. Because horses are banned from most of the route, the trails and meadows are still in good shape, despite the number of hikers.
Backpacking Oregon: From Rugged Coastline to Mountain Meadow

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Backpacking Oregon: From Rugged Coastline to Mountain Meadow

by Douglas Lorain (Wilderness Press)

The Timberline Trail circling Mount Hood is probably the most famous footpath in the state. Guidebooks describing the finest hiking trails in the nation often include this spectacular route, so Oregonians must share the trail with people from all over the country (and even international travelers). Even before the official trail was built by CCC workers in the 1930s, this round-the-mountain tour had many admirers—and justifiably so.

The mountain views are stunning, wildflowers choke the meadows, and exceptional side trips abound. The enormous trail population is dominated by dayhikers, who have access to every corner of the mountain. The Forest Service is currently proposing to restrict the numbers of hikers and campsites—an unfortunate but probably necessary step. Because horses are banned from most of the route, the trails and meadows are still in good shape, despite the number of hikers.

© 2007 Douglas Lorain/Wilderness Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Backpacking, Hiking
Nearby City: Government Camp
Length: 41
Elevation Gain: 8,600 feet
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Difficult
Duration: 3-5 days
Season: Usually open mid-July to October; best early to mid-August
Local Contacts: Mount Hood Information Center
Local Maps: Green Trails - Government Camp (#461) & Mount Hood (#462)
Topo Map: Timberline Trail Loop (Backpacking) Topographic Map
Guide Book: Backpacking Oregon: From Rugged Coastline to Mountain Meadow Guide Book
Driving Directions: View Directions
Trail Directions: View Guide

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Recent Trail Reviews

9/11/2009

Beautiful trip....traveled counterclockwise and camped around clark creek after a half day and about 6 miles. Second day crossed the Eliot drainage which is officially "closed" due to a washout in 2006 and hazardous conditions. There seems to be no enforcement of this closure and many groups are crossing. The safest, and my recommended way, around the washout is to follow the climbers trail along a ridge leading to Coopers spur (south side of drainage), just below the glacier is a trail leading down into the basin, take this and cross the basin (there will be little to no water flow here) to the north side and follow the climbers trail on the north side back down towards Cloud Cap where you will rejoin the #600 trail below the treeline. Allow an additional 1.5 to 2 hours. Alternately (much more hazardous) you may follow the climbers trail on the south side of the Elliot eastward towards Cloud Cap; just above the treeline you will come across a "trail" traversing across the steep scree slope down into the drainage. Before descending, look across to the scree slope on the north side where you will see a trail ascending to the top of the ridge (climbers trail); this will be your route. There are yellow ropes to assist to on both sides, nevertheless, this remains a hazardous route due to the steep scree slopes and potential for falls and rock fall.....be careful! We camped at Carin Basin the second night after about 12 miles. On day three we elected not to take the 600 trail from the PCT intersection to Ramona falls; the trail is washed out below the Muddy Fork of the Sandy. We instead took the PCT to Ramona falls. Fill up with water in the creek just after crossing the Sandy river if you plan on continuing to Paradise Park; this is a long climb with along the way until you reach Paradise. There is water and many great campsites here. back to T-line on day 4 Feel free to contact me if you have questions. moyda @comcast.net

8/8/2009

Everything I expected and more. This is one of the most beautiful hikes I have ever done. Mt. Hood seems so big now. Elliot Creek crossing is still washed out, but heading clockwise from the trailhead, we hiked down the ridge next to Elliot Creek, crossed the creek at the bottom, then climbed the mt. side to the top. At the top is Cloud Cap. The detour took us 1.5 hours.

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