Lord Hill Regional Park Trail

Snohomish, Washington

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4 Reviews
3 out of 5
Northwest of Snohomish, a large wooded ridge more than 600 feet high has been made into a county park, used year-round. It features marshy beaver ponds, loop trails with delightful outlooks over the Snohomish valley and south to Mount Rainier, and a descent trail to the banks of the Snohomish River. Children can enjoy these trails any time, if mud isn’t a problem, and what child doesn’t enjoy getting muddy? Mitchell Lord, for whom the park was named, owned the land and homestead until 1884. Have the kids look for his former home at the intersection of 127th Avenue SE and the old Snohomish–Monroe Highway. Today, second-growth timber covers the hills logged in the 1930s and surrounds a number of the park’s wetland ponds and springs. A map available at the trailhead suggests such destinations as Devil’s Butte Lookout, the park’s highpoint at 580 feet; Temple Ponds 1 and 2; Beaver Lake; English Pond; and Bald Hill Pond.
Best Hikes with Kids: Western Washington & the Cascades

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Best Hikes with Kids: Western Washington & the Cascades

by Joan Burton (The Mountaineers Books)

Northwest of Snohomish, a large wooded ridge more than 600 feet high has been made into a county park, used year-round. It features marshy beaver ponds, loop trails with delightful outlooks over the Snohomish valley and south to Mount Rainier, and a descent trail to the banks of the Snohomish River.

Children can enjoy these trails any time, if mud isn’t a problem, and what child doesn’t enjoy getting muddy? Mitchell Lord, for whom the park was named, owned the land and homestead until 1884. Have the kids look for his former home at the intersection of 127th Avenue SE and the old Snohomish–Monroe Highway. Today, second-growth timber covers the hills logged in the 1930s and surrounds a number of the park’s wetland ponds and springs. A map available at the trailhead suggests such destinations as Devil’s Butte Lookout, the park’s highpoint at 580 feet; Temple Ponds 1 and 2; Beaver Lake; English Pond; and Bald Hill Pond.

©  Joan Burton/The Mountaineers Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Snohomish
Elevation Gain: 300 feet
Trail Type: Several options
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: Day hike
Season: Year round
Trailhead Elevation: 100 feet
Top Elevation: 400 feet
Local Maps: USGS Maltby
Driving Directions: Directions to Lord Hill Regional Park Trail

Recent Trail Reviews

3/21/2018
1

This park was wonderful!! There are so many trails and you can really spend the whole day out there if you like or you can do a quick half hour loop if you prefer. We saw people with kids, a few people with their dogs, and some bikers. We would definitely recommend this park to all types of outdoors-people because there are different types of trails and different ability levels. Some of the trails aren’t marked which we thought was great because it made it more adventurous! We are lunch beside the Snohomish River and enjoyed seeing deer, snakes, and various types of birds. (Don’t worry they were tiny little snakes; my husband assured me they’re totally harmless). We also saw several different types of footprints which was fun. Highly recommend this trail system for a fun day.


3/21/2012
0

Spent 3 hours hiking around with my dog. The maps posted around are the easiest to read but there are some really great views. There are a few "piles" left on the trails from the horses but not a big bother. Trails are in great shape and well maintained. There is a port-a-john in the parking lot for those who dare. I'll be back for another lovley afternoon.


4/1/2010
0

8/20/2009
0

I went mountain biking here. Nice trails for the most part, easy to navigate the trail system. Not the most amazing single track you'll find, but not a bad place to ride if you live in the area and dont want to make a longer drive. The climb back to the parking lot seems steeper and harder than it did coming down. Horses and hikers also use these trails.



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Apr 2018