Gobblers Knob via Alexander Basin

Salt Lake City, Utah

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1 Review
4 out of 5
This popular summit offers great views in all directions, but the most memorable sight will be of the wildflowers that fill Alexander Basin in spring and summer. The steep hike offers some easy scrambling and route-finding up a glacial cirque to the ridge, followed by a short jaunt to the summit.
60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City

DESCRIPTION FROM:

60 Hikes within 60 Miles: Salt Lake City

by Greg Witt (Menasha Ridge Press)

This popular summit offers great views in all directions, but the most memorable sight will be of the wildflowers that fill Alexander Basin in spring and summer. The steep hike offers some easy scrambling and route-finding up a glacial cirque to the ridge, followed by a short jaunt to the summit.

©  Greg Witt/Menasha Ridge Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Salt Lake City
Distance: 4.4
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: 4–5 hours
Season: Summer–early fall.
Local Contacts: Ulina-Wasatch Cache National Forest
Local Maps: USGS: Mount Aire
Driving Directions: Directions to Gobblers Knob (via Alexander Basin)

Recent Trail Reviews

10/1/2010
0

This is a pleasant walk up to the Wasatch Crest Trail that runs north and south for several miles above the Canyons Resort and Park City. The views are spectacular from this ridge. There are several summits along this ridge that can be reached easily from the trail and look-outs from the trail that afford views both east all the way to the Uinta area as well as to the west down both Mill Creek and Big Cottonwood and the dividing ridges. This is a great place to see the “lay of the land”. This route is the easiest way to reach this ridge-line. It travels through varied scenery and grade is easy to moderate. The colors were spectacular on our Oct 1 trip. The distance in the guide appears to be understated. My GPS read just under 3 miles to the crest. Also, there several meadows along this route while the guide seems to highlight one as a benchmark. If you are looking for “a meadow”, you’ll find many. We did not go up to Murdock Peak but went right (south) at the junction and walked along the crest. There is a lot to see this way. Many of the available maps are confusing and place/trail names have changed several times over the years. Some of the trails have been re-rerouted or closed, but the main trail known by various names pretty easy to follow. It’s an old road that at one time went over the crest down into Summit County. In places it’s hard to imagine any vehicle ever getting up this route. The trail past the bridge is not in very good condition. There are many cut-off and informal diversions that appear to have been made by numerous hikers trying to avoid difficult steam crossings and overflows, or for fishermen to reach the stream. I recommend staying to the left of the creek. There is a new trail being completed that branches to the left of the “Road”. It was still “closed” when we went up but other hikers took this route and told us it actually finished.



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Apr 2018