Cucamonga Peak

Ontario, California

4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
1 Review
4 out of 5
This rewarding trip takes hikers from the upper reaches of San Antonio Canyon through the heart of the Cucamonga Wilderness to the landmark pyramid of Cucamonga Peak, where panoramic vistas unfold. The San Gabriel Mountains are part of California’s Transverse Ranges province. These ranges extend east-west across the framework of California’s predominantly northwest-southeast–trending mountains and valleys. The Transverse Ranges province is approximately 300 miles long, stretching from the Eagle and Pinto Mountains of Joshua Tree National Park in the east to Point Arguello near Santa Barbara in the west.Typically, the highest terrain lies near the eastern terminus of each of the mountain ranges constituting this province. Cucamonga Peak stands high on the eastern end of the San Gabriel Mountains, soaring out of the deep gash of the San Andreas Rift Zone.This flat-topped “volcano-shaped” mountain is a familiar landmark to many southern Californians and is one of the most remote mountains in the range.The shortest route to its lofty summit involves a minimum 6 miles of hiking and thousands of feet of elevation gain. But hikers who complete this strenuous trip are rewarded with sweeping vistas of a large portion of southern California. The subalpine forest of weather-beaten lodgepole pine on this flat, sandy summit offers a cool respite from oppressive summertime heat in the valleys below. Hikers relaxing on the summit often see a variety of soaring raptors riding the strong thermals that often sweep the slopes of the peak. Usually taken as a day hike, this trip can be extended by an overnight stay in Cedar Glen or Kelly Camp, both of which have water.
Hiking Southern California

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking Southern California

by Ron Adkison (Falcon Guides)

This rewarding trip takes hikers from the upper reaches of San Antonio Canyon through the heart of the Cucamonga Wilderness to the landmark pyramid of Cucamonga Peak, where panoramic vistas unfold. The San Gabriel Mountains are part of California’s Transverse Ranges province. These ranges extend east-west across the framework of California’s predominantly northwest-southeast–trending mountains and valleys. The Transverse Ranges province is approximately 300 miles long, stretching from the Eagle and Pinto Mountains of Joshua Tree National Park in the east to Point Arguello near Santa Barbara in the west.Typically, the highest terrain lies near the eastern terminus of each of the mountain ranges constituting this province. Cucamonga Peak stands high on the eastern end of the San Gabriel Mountains, soaring out of the deep gash of the San Andreas Rift Zone.This flat-topped “volcano-shaped” mountain is a familiar landmark to many southern Californians and is one of the most remote mountains in the range.The shortest route to its lofty summit involves a minimum 6 miles of hiking and thousands of feet of elevation gain. But hikers who complete this strenuous trip are rewarded with sweeping vistas of a large portion of southern California. The subalpine forest of weather-beaten lodgepole pine on this flat, sandy summit offers a cool respite from oppressive summertime heat in the valleys below. Hikers relaxing on the summit often see a variety of soaring raptors riding the strong thermals that often sweep the slopes of the peak. Usually taken as a day hike, this trip can be extended by an overnight stay in Cedar Glen or Kelly Camp, both of which have water.

© 2003 Ron Adkison/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Ontario
Distance: 7
Elevation Gain: 3,859 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Difficult
Duration: 7 hours
Season: Best late May through mid-November
Trailhead Elevation: 5,000 feet
Top Elevation: 8,859 feet
Local Contacts: Angeles National Forest, Mount Baldy Ranger District
Local Maps: USGS Mount Baldy, Telegraph Peak, Cucamonga Peak
Topo Map: Cucamonga Peak Topographic Map
Guide Book: Hiking Southern California Guide Book
Driving Directions: View Directions
Trail Directions: View Guide

Trail Photos

Got photos of this trail? Upload Now

Recent Trail Reviews

2/12/2005

I've done this hike during summer and winter, both with my dog. Summer provides a nice hiking option away from the heat, and once you get past Ice House Saddle, the crowds dissappear, as most hikers in search of a peak to bag head up the much lower and easier Timber Mountain. The hike to Cucamonga is not as spectacular as the trip up nearby Mt. Baldy, but it provides more solitude. In the winter, crampons and/or snowshoes are necessary. Also, be sure to pick up a wilderness permit at the Mt. Baldy Ranger Station - depending on the ranger on duty on the trail, you may be sent back if you don't have one. Be sure to arrive early on the weekends, as the parking lot fills up in a hurry. If you live in the LA area, and you haven't yet done this hike, and you're taking the time to read this review, then, by all means, get off your computer and get on this trail.

View All Reviews

Nearby Trails

Activity Feed


Added Waterfall Canyon to wishlist

Joined Trails

Joined Trails