Grand Gulch via Collins Canyon

Blanding, Utah

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
Here’s a cliff dwelling that has just about everything you’d hope to find at a Native American ruin—nicely preserved walls, pottery, rock art, corncobs, stone tools, and even a kiva. You’ll find the ruin after a pleasant hike down Collins Canyon, a tributary of Grand Gulch, and then down the gulch a couple of miles. The ruin sits in what might be described as a “double-decker” enclave. The upper enclave, which holds the main ruin, is completely inaccessible to visitors. However, it’s low enough that you can get a good look at the well-preserved walls and intact doors of the cliff dwelling. Two wooden beams in front of the dwelling appear to form banisters, a feature that prompted the site’s common name, Banister Ruin. The Ancestral Pueblo people, who built the ruin sometime between A.D. 1060 and 1270, probably used ladders to reach the upper dwelling. The lower enclave houses an amazingly well-preserved structure that could easily be mistaken for an oven or kiln, but it’s actually a kiva.
Hiking Ruins Seldom Seen

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking Ruins Seldom Seen

by Dave Wilson (Falcon Guides)

Here’s a cliff dwelling that has just about everything you’d hope to find at a Native American ruin—nicely preserved walls, pottery, rock art, corncobs, stone tools, and even a kiva. You’ll find the ruin after a pleasant hike down Collins Canyon, a tributary of Grand Gulch, and then down the gulch a couple of miles. The ruin sits in what might be described as a “double-decker” enclave.

The upper enclave, which holds the main ruin, is completely inaccessible to visitors. However, it’s low enough that you can get a good look at the well-preserved walls and intact doors of the cliff dwelling. Two wooden beams in front of the dwelling appear to form banisters, a feature that prompted the site’s common name, Banister Ruin. The Ancestral Pueblo people, who built the ruin sometime between A.D. 1060 and 1270, probably used ladders to reach the upper dwelling. The lower enclave houses an amazingly well-preserved structure that could easily be mistaken for an oven or kiln, but it’s actually a kiva.

©  Dave Wilson/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Blanding
Distance: 8
Elevation Gain: 200 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Skill Level: Moderate
Duration: Day Hike
Local Contacts: Bureau of Land Management
Local Maps: USGS Red House Spring
Driving Directions: Directions to Grand Gulch (via Collins Canyon)

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Activity Feed

Apr 2018