Schenck Forest

Raleigh, North Carolina

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1 Review
3 out of 5
Like Duke Forest near Durham, Schenck Forest is a university research tract. Just southeast of Umstead State Park, the woodsy 360 acres serve North Carolina State University’s Department of Forestry. It was established in 1936 with the planting of 80 acres of loblolly pine on exhausted fields by the Depression-era Works Progress Administration. The forest has an easy loop hike called the Frances Liles Interpretive Trail. The lengthy Richland Creek Trail also passes through the forest, connecting William B. Umstead State Park’s Loblolly Trail to the west and PNC Arena and North Carolina State University’s Carter Finley Stadium to the east. The forest’s main parking area on Reedy Creek Road is close to the paved Reedy Creek Greenway, which also links west to the state park’s multiuse trails (and Loblolly Trail) and runs east to the North Carolina Museum of Art and downtown Raleigh. That makes it easy to ride your bike to hikes at Schenck Forest and Umstead State Park. No dogs, bikes, horses, hunting, or geocaching are permitted in the forest—and do not block gates.
Hiking North Carolina

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking North Carolina

by Randy Johnson (Falcon Guides)

Like Duke Forest near Durham, Schenck Forest is a university research tract. Just southeast of Umstead State Park, the woodsy 360 acres serve North Carolina State University’s Department of Forestry. It was established in 1936 with the planting of 80 acres of loblolly pine on exhausted fields by the Depression-era Works Progress Administration. The forest has an easy loop hike called the Frances Liles Interpretive
Trail.

The lengthy Richland Creek Trail also passes through the forest, connecting William B. Umstead State Park’s Loblolly Trail to the west and PNC Arena and North Carolina State University’s Carter Finley Stadium to the east. The forest’s
main parking area on Reedy Creek Road is close to the paved Reedy Creek Greenway, which also links west to the state park’s multiuse trails (and Loblolly Trail) and runs east to the North Carolina Museum of Art and downtown Raleigh. That makes it easy to ride your bike to hikes at Schenck Forest and Umstead State Park. No dogs, bikes, horses, hunting, or geocaching are permitted in the forest—and do not block gates.

© 2016 Randy Johnson/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Raleigh
Distance: 1.2-10 miles
Trail Type: Several options
Skill Level: Moderate to Difficult
Local Contacts: William B. Umstead State Park; ncparks.gov/Visit/parks/wium/main.php.Schenck Forest (919) 515-2883; sites.google.com/a/ncsu.edu/ncsudof-forests/home/carlalwinschenckmemorialforest#TOC-Map e- mail: naturalresources@ncsu.edu
Local Maps: USGS Cary and Raleigh West. Download trail maps at the parks’ website
Driving Directions: Directions to Schenck Forest

Recent Trail Reviews

7/13/2007
1

I loved about 75% of this trail, would have rated it a four except for the 25% of the trail that ran right along I-40 and there was constant traffic noise. This is an urban trail sandwiched right in the middle of Raleigh, Durham and Cary North Carolina so that's to be expected. I started the trail at the western end at Umstead Park on a Friday during workday hours. The Loblolly trail is well marked in the park with green trail markers. I'm always amazed at how quiet it can be in Umstead Park in spite of the urban location. Once I the crossed Reedy Road Lake Trail I didn't see any more hikers or trail runners and the trail was criss-crossed with spider webs, so I knew it had been a while since anyone had been through. Once Loblolly trial leaves the park it is fairly well marked with white blazes painted on trees. In the transition from the park to Schenck Forest you hike through the Richland Creek flood control area and lake. After the grassy part of this trail you might want to check for ticks, I found a few on my legs. In the Richland Creek flood area and the first half of the Schenck Forest I saw plenty of deer and also Great Blue Hereon on the lake. I have a few of the trail landmarks and some wildlife photos posted at http://gejr0405.phanfare.com/album/346564



Trail Photos

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