Gilman Pond

North New Portland, Maine

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Gilman Pond is a delightful little out-of-the way pond in the Rangeley Lakes region. Nestled into a valley surrounded by forested hills, this picturesque pond offers the opportunity for several hours of quiet paddling, especially if you paddle all the way down to Route 16, a roundtrip distance of about five miles. Although we found the outlet to be most interesting, the north end of the pond, choked with sedges, equisetum, buttonbush, and other aquatic vegetation, is well worth exploring. Note Sandy Stream flowing down through the scattered silver maples on the northern peninsula. The fact that it has a good flow of water but is choked with impenetrable sedges indicates that boats do not ply these waters in great numbers. The cove on the northeast side of the peninsula is quieter and more marshy than the one on the other side. The shoreline sports a wide variety of tree species, but particularly noticeable on the north end are cedar, paper birch, spruce, hemlock, and balsam fir.
Quiet Water Maine: Canoe and Kayak Guide, 2nd Edition

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Quiet Water Maine: Canoe and Kayak Guide, 2nd Edition

by John Hayes & Alex Wilson (Appalachian Mountain Club Books)

Gilman Pond is a delightful little out-of-the way pond in the Rangeley Lakes region. Nestled into a valley surrounded by forested hills, this picturesque pond offers the opportunity for several hours of quiet paddling, especially if you paddle all the way down to Route 16, a roundtrip distance of about five miles. Although we found the outlet to be most interesting, the north end of the pond, choked with sedges, equisetum, buttonbush, and other aquatic vegetation, is well worth exploring.

Note Sandy Stream flowing down through the scattered silver maples on the northern peninsula. The fact that it has a good flow of water but is choked with impenetrable sedges indicates that boats do not ply these waters in great numbers. The cove on the northeast side of the peninsula is quieter and more marshy than the one on the other side. The shoreline sports a wide variety of tree species, but particularly noticeable on the north end are cedar, paper birch, spruce, hemlock, and balsam fir.

©  John Hayes & Alex Wilson/Appalachian Mountain Club Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Flatwater Kayaking & Canoeing
Nearby City: North New Portland
Distance: 5
Skill Level: Easy
Duration: Day trip, camping available
Class: Class I
Season: Best spring through fall
Local Contacts: Gilman Pond Campground
Local Maps: USGS New Portland
Driving Directions: Directions to Gilman Pond

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Apr 2018