Jack's Fork River The Prongs to the Current River

Mountain View , Missouri

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The Jack’s Fork Rive, the major tributary of the Current River, offers approximately 46 miles of canoeable water. The two rivers make up the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, administered by the National Park Service. Expect a remote wilderness experience on the Jack’s Fork in the fall, winter, and early spring, but armies of paddlers invade the river during the warm summer months, aided by a multitude of canoe-rental concessionaires and campgrounds. Everyone comes to enjoy the crystal-clear water that emanates from an abundance of springs along the route. Put-in at The Prongs, where two small tributaries combine to form the Jack’s Fork River. Access the river where SR Y crosses it. This section is normally canoeable only after good rains or a wet spring. The stretch from The Prongs to Alley Spring includes some of the wildest riparian scenery in the region. There are few signs of civilization in the upper sections, where crystal-clear water courses between the famous Ozark hardwood forests and stark bluffs formed by the never-ending erosion of the streambed. Paddlers feel as though they are navigating through a gorge, thanks to dense forest that blocks any view of pastoral land nearby. The only signs of civilization are the remnants of early settler homesteads and several bridges that cross the river at Alley Spring and Eminence. Below Eminence the river passes several campgrounds, which detract slightly from the wilderness experience.
A Canoeing & Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks

DESCRIPTION FROM:

A Canoeing & Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks

by Tom Kennon (Menasha Ridge Press)

The Jack’s Fork Rive, the major tributary of the Current River, offers approximately 46 miles of canoeable water. The two rivers make up the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, administered by the National Park Service. Expect a remote wilderness experience on the Jack’s Fork in the fall, winter, and early spring, but armies of paddlers invade the river during the warm summer months, aided by a multitude of canoe-rental concessionaires and campgrounds. Everyone comes to enjoy the crystal-clear water that emanates from an abundance of springs along the route. Put-in at The Prongs, where two small tributaries combine to form the Jack’s Fork River. Access the river where SR Y crosses it. This section is normally canoeable only after good rains or a wet spring.

The stretch from The Prongs to Alley Spring includes some of the wildest riparian scenery in the region. There are few signs of civilization in the upper sections, where crystal-clear water courses between the famous Ozark hardwood forests and stark bluffs formed by the never-ending erosion of the streambed. Paddlers feel as though they are navigating through a gorge, thanks to dense forest that blocks any view of pastoral land nearby. The only signs of civilization are the remnants of early settler homesteads and several bridges that cross the river at Alley Spring and Eminence. Below Eminence the river passes several campgrounds, which detract slightly from the wilderness experience.

©  Tom Kennon/Menasha Ridge Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Flatwater Kayaking & Canoeing
Nearby City: Mountain View
Distance: 53.6
Duration: 6 sections range from 2 to 6 hours
Class: Class I-II
Local Maps: USGS Pine Crest, Jam-up Cave, Bartlett, Alley Spring, Eminence, Powder Mill Ferry
Driving Directions: Directions to Jack's Fork River: The Prongs to the Current River

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Apr 2018