Cranberry Country Cruise

Plymouth, Massachusetts

4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars4 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
4 out of 5
This ride begins in historic Plymouth. Before exploring this town, though, the tour heads inland on sandy-shouldered roads for a rolling, 7-mile cruise through the largest state forest in eastern Massachusetts, which is also a pine barren. Myles Standish State Forest has miles of secluded paved roads, a 15-mile paved bike path that hugs the up-and-down contours of the land, and 30 or so miles of sandy trails for mountain biking and hiking. Pine barrens are a natural wonder: made up almost entirely of small pine and scrub oak trees-and sand. Pine barrens are sunny and open, with some of the purest water in the world lying underneath them. Terrain: rolling terrain, with no major climbs. Traffic/Safety: because this is a coastal environment, quite a few of the roads have soft, sandy shoulders, and several are narrow.
Best Bike Rides in New England

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Best Bike Rides in New England

by Paul Thomas (The Globe Pequot Press)

This ride begins in historic Plymouth. Before exploring this town, though, the tour heads inland on sandy-shouldered roads for a rolling, 7-mile cruise through the largest state forest in eastern Massachusetts, which is also a pine barren. Myles Standish State Forest has miles of secluded paved roads, a 15-mile paved bike path that hugs the up-and-down contours of the land, and 30 or so miles of sandy trails for mountain biking and hiking.

Pine barrens are a natural wonder: made up almost entirely of small pine and scrub oak trees-and sand. Pine barrens are sunny and open, with some of the purest water in the world lying underneath them. Terrain: rolling terrain, with no major climbs. Traffic/Safety: because this is a coastal environment, quite a few of the roads have soft, sandy shoulders, and several are narrow.

©  Paul Thomas/The Globe Pequot Press. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Road Biking
Nearby City: Plymouth
Distance: 47
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Moderate
Driving Directions: Directions to Cranberry Country Cruise

Recent Trail Reviews

5/6/2008
0

Great ride my only complaint is the distances are a little off but nothing to out of line. Country Store I believe is no longer open so may want to pick a better stopping point for food and drink, there is a gift shop/diner but not that great. Not alot of options for food to go. Other than that the ride is great.


5/24/2002
0

This is a beautiful moderate level trail winding through Myles Standish State Forest and the Plymouth, MA shoreline. There are many small hills in the forest (like a small rollercoaster) and a long steady climb towards the end. Having recently started riding again, I was telling my sister about a 37-mile ride I took one Saturday, and she suggested that I work up to a metric century ride, perhaps before the end of the Summer. Well I gotta say, it sounded good but what the heck, why wait? I took a vacation day on the Friday before Memorial Day knowing that the kids would be in school and my wife was away for the day (sneaky, huh?). Earlier that week a friend lent me a "Best Bike Rides in Massachusetts" book, and there was a 47-mile ride near my home. I found that by riding to the starting point rather than driving I could add enough distance for my 100K. The starting point was the Jenney Grist Mill in Plymouth – a beautifully restored mill - the first in the New World. Quickly along the route I was deep in the Myles Standish State Forest, rolling up and down short grades and curling around College Pond – just breathtaking. After a short jaunt beyond the forest, I was heading southwest towards the Cape Cod Canal. At about the 40-mile mark I stopped in the shade of the little village of Bournedale. It was time to rest, chug some fluids, crack a powerbar, and slather on some sunscreen – all in about 20 minutes. I climbed back on my ride and headed for Buttermilk Bay. I continued on – now heading along the Plymouth shoreline. Whitehorse Beach, Priscilla Beach, then back towards Plymouth center. Before I knew it, I was back to the mill and home – 64.75 miles. I had just completed my first metric century, and I felt great. I couldn't wait to brag! Now what's next? A full century in September maybe? – Jim Zoino



Trail Photos

Keep Me Informed

Weekly newsletters, announcements and offers from Trails.com to your inbox.

Sign me up!

We HATE spam and promise to keep your email addresses safe and secure.

Activity Feed

Apr 2018