Hybrid Bluegill Fishing Tips

Hybrid Bluegill Fishing Tips
Hybrid bluegills are a cross between a female sunfish and a male bluegill. These are a man-made creation, stemming from cross-breeding trials to create a larger and faster-growing pan fish. They are sold nationally by fish-stocking companies to use in ponds and man-made lakes. Fishing these small shallow bodies of water is often done from shore or small boat, which can lead to different fishing techniques.
 

Vegetation

Hybrid bluegills like to be in the shelter of thick vegetation. It can be hard to target fish in the vegetation without your bait getting snagged. An easy setup is to use a bobber and hook to suspend live bait just above the vegetation or in pockets between plants. The hybrid bluegills often strike out from this shelter of vegetation to bite the bait. Many small bluegills populate these same areas, so the catches will be mixed between all sizes of fish.

 
 

Bait

Live bait is the preferred choice for most bluegill anglers because it has produced the best results. Hybrid bluegills feed on mostly the same things that standard bluegills and sunfish feed on. Red worms, wax worms, crickets and minnows are the most common baits used. Artificial baits and lures, such as dry flies and small spinners, can also be used successfully. Flies are especially effective during hatch periods at twilight. Large hybrids will bite these top water flies aggressively.

Tackle

Spinning tackle is the preferred tackle by most anglers, but fly rods can also be used. Either choice should be light or ultra-light in weight. Line weight should be 2 pounds to 4 pounds and clear or red to be invisible in water. Using lightweight tackle will not only let you feel sensitive bites better but will also make the fight seem much stronger.

 

Article Written By Matthew Knight

Based in Southwestern Michigan, Matthew Knight has been writing outdoor and technology articles since 2008. His articles appear on various websites. He holds a bachelor's degree in computer information systems from Western Michigan University.

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