Tips on Spring Bass Fishing at Night

Tips on Spring Bass Fishing at Night
Spring is the start of bass season for most areas of the United States. It is a good time to catch some large bass while they are spawning in the shallows. Although spring night fishing is not as effective as in the summer, it can still produce large fish. Try scoping out bedding areas during the day to be most effective during the darkness.
 

Location

Bass should be targeted in the shallow water near shore during springtime. Bass make spawning beds in shallow, sandy spots near the shore, and females will often not leave these beds for extended periods of time. Males also will cruise the shallow waters in search of food during the spring. Fish will be active during the night, trying to make up for lack of food during the winter months. It is also a prime location, because the water is much warmer than the deeper areas.

 
 

Lures

Soft baits, such as plastic worms and lizards, work well for springtime night fishing. They are easily casted accurately around bedding areas targeting fish. They also provide excellent depth control. For periods right after nightfall, top-water baits, such as jitterbugs, can be successful. Bright colors, such as green and yellow, work well at this time of year.

Live Bait

Minnows and night crawlers work well when presented in bedding areas. These baits won't be quite as effective in the darkness but will often still catch some fish.

Line

Line is not as important at night, as it will not be seen in the darkness. Heavier line can be used, which will give you an advantage when fighting large fish.

Casting

When fishing on the beds, cast the bait past the bed so as not to spook the fish. You should also try to make minimal noise when landing the bait into the water.

 

Article Written By Matthew Knight

Based in Southwestern Michigan, Matthew Knight has been writing outdoor and technology articles since 2008. His articles appear on various websites. He holds a bachelor's degree in computer information systems from Western Michigan University.

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