Tips on Walleye Fishing

Salmon Eggs for fishing baitWalleyes are a popular game fish in North America, thanks to their fighting ability and willingness to bite on a wide range of fishing techniques. But walleyes can be fickle at times. It takes some savvy tricks to consistently put fish in the boat.

Pay Attention to the Jig

Jigging is a technique in which a jig -- essentially a weighted hook -- is lowered to the fish and the angler uses a jigging motion to cause the walleye to bite. This sounds simple, but it's the jigging motion that brings home the fillets. Some days, an aggressive jigging motion that moves the bait 6 to 12 inches off the bottom is the ticket. Other days, a slow lift--and-drop move is the trigger. No matter what worked the day before, always pay close attention to your jigging motion.

Watch the Speed

Trolling works well to find walleyes spread out on large bodies of water. These fish are roaming the open water looking to feed on large schools of bait fish like shiner minnows. No matter if you are using crank baits or spoons, pay close attention to your trolling speed. Walleyes tend to prefer lures with a slow wiggle that are moving 1.2 to 1.5 miles per hour. An accurate speed gauge on your fish finder or GPS will help you set the proper speed.

Add Some Scent

Walleyes can smell like a bloodhound and if your bait or lure does not smell good, you will not get a bite. Human scent, oil, gas and tobacco all give off an adverse smell that walleyes with reject. Use scents like emerald shiner or shad on your spoons. Add a dab of nightcrawler or leech scent when jigging. Reapply the scent often to your bait to keep a fresh scent trail.

Article Written By Brian M. Kelly

Brian M. Kelly has been freelance writing since 2003. His work has been published in respected outdoor magazines such as Outdoor Life, Great Lakes Angler and Salmon Trout Steelheader. He holds an associate's degree in automated machine design from Macomb College.

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