A List of Washington D.C. Monuments

A List of Washington D.C. Monuments
The capital of the United States is home to the White House and Capitol Hill as well as numerous iconic memorials and monuments, including the Lincoln Memorial, Thomas Jefferson Memorial and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The Mall, a wide area of national parkland between the Capitol and the Washington Monument, is lined with renowned museums, most of which are free to the public. Considered to be America's town green, The Mall features a historic carousel and jogging paths and is also a popular location for rallies, protesters, outdoor festivals and fireworks. Learn more about the history of the United States as well as honor the countries past presidents and fallen heroes when you visit the monuments of Washington, D.C.

The Washington Monument

Completed on December 6, 1884, the most prominent structure in the nation's capital was built in honor of the first U.S. President, George Washington, who led the country to independence. Shaped like an Egyptian obelisk, the monument is just over 555 feet tall and by law, it will remain the tallest structure in Washington, D.C. The capstone weighs 3,300 pounds and features the Latin phrase for Praise to God, "Laus Deo." Approximately 30 miles, including most of most of the District of Columbia and parts of Maryland and Virginia, can be seen from the viewing stations at the top of the monument. An elevator carries visitors to the top and you usually have the option to return down on the elevator or walk down almost 900 steps to ground level. Admission is free but a ticket is required for entrance.

The Washington Monument
Constitution Avenue and 15th Street Northwest, The Mall
Washington, D.C.
(202) 426-6841
nps.gov/wamo

The Peace Monument

Commemorating the Naval officers, seamen and marines who died at sea during the Civil War, the white Carrara sculpture is also commonly referred to as the Naval Monument. Admiral David D. Porter, who served during the Civil War, was the original advocate of the memorial and worked with the U.S. sculptor Franklin Simmons to create the design. Erected between 1877 and1878, the 44 foot high monument stands in the circle at Pennsylvania Avenue and First Street, Northwest. The structure is carved near the top with numerous figures, including the female figures representing Grief, History and Victory. Looking below Victory, infants representing Mars, the god of war and Neptune, god of the sea, can be seen. The main column features wreaths, ribbons and scallop shells. A classical figure representing Peace faces the Capitol and symbols of science, literature and art are also depicted.

The Peace Monument
First Street and Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest
Washington, D.C.
aoc.gov/cc/grounds/art_arch/peace.cfm

The Garfield Monument

President James A. Garfield was assassinated in 1881 after serving only four months in office. In 1884, the Society of the Army of the Cumberland commissioned a memorial of their late member. The monument was sculpted by John Quincy Adams Ward, who was friends with Garfield. It was cast by the Henry-Bonnard Company of New York and the pedestal was designed by Richard Morris Hunt. Unveiled on May 12, 1888, it was incorporated into the Capitol Grounds in 1975. Featuring four bronze figures, a portrait statue of Garfield is at the top of the structure with three figures representing different phases of his career, as a teacher, as a military officer during the Civil War and as a statesman.

The Garfield Monument
First Street, Southwest and Maryland Avenue
Washington, D.C.
aoc.gov/cc/grounds/art_arch/garfield.cfm

Article Written By Betsy Bender

Betsy Bender is a media consultant with experience in publishing, event management, media relations, digital media and television production. Specializing in entertainment, travel and sports, Bender has worked with high-profile personalities, facilitated publicity campaigns for network television programs and traveled to more than 100 cities in eight countries, including Russia and Australia.

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