Tips to Catch Huge Bass at Night

Tips to Catch Huge Bass at Night
Night fishing is an ideal time to catch bass. Boat traffic is usually gentler, allowing the fish to come out and feed more freely. The quiet can also be very pleasant, allowing you to focus on angling and let everything else slip away. Most importantly, the night is the best time to catch really large bass. Many of the big fish wait out the day and feed most actively during the first and last hour of dark.
 

Pick the Right Night

Fish on the nights when the bass are feeding most heavily. According to the Inside Line fishing website, bass start to feed quite frantically once the water temperature drops below 62 degrees F in the fall, instinctively bulking up for winter. Between 62 and 54 degrees F, they continue to feed frantically. Once the temperature drops below 54 degrees F, however, bass metabolism slows somewhat and they bite more slowly. If you can, fish on a night with a full or nearly full moon and clear sky. Bass seem to bite more aggressively in cold weather when there is light.

 
 

Go Big

Use large, bulky, rattling baits. At night, bass rely more on sound and movement to cue them in to the location of their prey. Long, fat worm lures, bulky crank baits and large spinner baits move a lot of water, according to Inside Line, getting the attention of the big bass you want to catch.

Be Careful

Cast out and reel your line in slowly, with a natural stop-and-start motion to make it more convincing. Although bass may be adept at using their other senses, they can still have a hard time finding your bait at night if you move it too quickly. You should also exercise care to move your boat slowly and quietly. During the day, the fish may tune out the sounds of boats on a high-traffic lake to some degree, but in the quiet of night, your engine can spook the bass much more easily.

 

Article Written By Isaiah David

Isaiah David is a freelance writer and musician living in Portland, Ore. He has over five years experience as a professional writer and has been published on various online outlets. He holds a degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan.

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