Fishing at Curlew Lake, Washington

Fishing at Curlew Lake, Washington
Curlew Lake is a mid-size lake in the Okanagon region of eastern Washington state. Anglers can expect to catch trout, bass and tiger muskie. The lake is named after the Long-billed curlew, a species of shore bird. The lake is seven miles long and reaches a maximum depth of approximately 130 feet. There are several lodges and fishing guide services around the lake. When fishing the lake, make sure to have a valid Washington state fishing license.
 

Fisherman's Cove

Fisherman's Cove Resort offers fishing from its property and packages for the angler traveling to the region. There are platform/barge boats for rent. Staff at the resort will assist with tips, bait and tackle choices and advice on where to fish the lake. You can fish for muskies and trout from the lodge and docks. If you are fishing during the summer months, bring a pair of polarized sunglasses and a sunhat. The resort has a game and fish locker to store your catch.

Fisherman's Cove
15 Fisherman's Cove Road
Republic, WA 99166
509-775-3641
fishermanscove.us

 
 

Curlew Lake State Park

There are two no-fee, public boat launches at the Curlew Lake State Park. You can put in and head out for fishing or stay in the park and fish from the shoreline. You can fish for largemouth bass and trout from the park's shoreline. Using live bait such as nightcrawlers or minnows is recommended for bass. Jigging spoons, poppers or fly-fishing can be done for trout. The park is also home to bears, foxes, coyotes, cougars and eagles.

Curlew Lake State Park
62 State Park Road
Republic, WA 99166
stateparks.com/curlew_lake.html

Trolling and Still Fishing

The FerryCounty.com website offers a map with recommendations where to troll and where to still fish on Curlew Lake. Heckler's Point, Tiffany's, the shoreline south of Black Beach Resort and the midway point between Wiseman's and Beaver Island are recommended still fishing areas. Trollers should head to Julien Bay and the waters off shore from Curlew Lake State Park. Use jigging spoons in the trolling regions. Still fishermen should try using nightcrawlers or minnows for largemouth bass.

 

Article Written By Eric Cedric

A former Alaskan of 20 years, Eric Cedric now resides in California. He's published in "Outside" and "Backpacker" and has written a book on life in small-town Alaska, "North by Southeast." Cedric was a professional mountain guide and backcountry expedition leader for 18 years. He worked in Russia, Iceland, Greece, Turkey and Belize. Cedric attended Syracuse University and is a private pilot.

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