What Are the Monuments in Greece?

What Are the Monuments in Greece?
Greece's many ancient monuments are not just historical and cultural sites but also major tourist destinations. With their long history dating back thousands of years, they have left a significant mark on world civilization. Visitors to Greece have the opportunity to experience unique and interesting journeys to these sites.

Acropolis of Athens

The Acropolis of Athens (meaning "highest city" in Greek) represents classical Greek culture at its peak. Attributed as the most secure place in town, ancient Greeks considered it a place of refuge in times of invasion. Now, the Acropolis provides many historical associations and cultural sites for tourists. It is ideal to visit the Acropolis in the morning or late in the afternoon as it gets very hot and humid when climbing up the site. This also provides a great view of the ancient structure being touched by the early morning or late afternoon sun. There are Acropolis tours starting from the Syntagma Square to the other major places in the Acropolis. Other sites in the area include the Pinacotheca, the Hellenistic pedestal and the Temple of Athena Nike (Athena of Victory), which stands on a platform overlooking the islands of the Saronic Gulf.

Acropolis of Athens
Acropolis, Atenas, Attikí
Greece

Temple of ---era on Samos

The Temple of Hera on Samos is an ionic dipteral temple built during the tyranny of Polycrates. It dates from around 538 to 522 B.C. There is only one column still standing today and it is preserved for up to one half of its original height. The ancient Greek historian Herodotus considered this temple as the largest in Greece. The original ancient structure includes a total of 155 columns belonging to four different sizes and types.

Temple of ---era on Samos
Official Unit: 21st Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities
Heraion, Samos (Prefecture of Samos)
Greece

Church of Agios Dimitrios

Made up of a five-aisled basilica with a crypt under its sanctuary, the Church of Agios Dimitrios is the first church originally built as a small oratory right on the ruins of a Roman bath. In the fifth century A.D., the eparch Leontios (Greek ruler) built on the same site a large, three-aisled basilica that unfortunately burnt down around 626 to 634 A.D. Shortly thereafter, the five-aisled basilica was erected to become a witness to a number of more historical changes. In 1493, it was converted into a mosque. Then in 1912, it was restored to Christian worship. However, it was destroyed again during the great fire of 1917. In 1949, it was rebuilt once again into what it presently is.

The crypt has an exhibition on display for the public including the items surviving the fire of 1917 and those brought to light by the recent excavations in the monument. The church has an attached chapel for Saint Euthymios located at its southeast corner.

Church of Agios Dimitrios
83 Aghiou Dimitriou St.
Thessaloniki
Greece‎

Philopappos Monument

Located in the Mouseion Hill in Athens, southwest of the Acropolis, is the ancient Greek mausoleum and monument called the Philopappos Monument. It is dedicated to Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappos, a prince from the Kingdom of Commagene. His death caused great grief to his sister Julia Balbilla, the citizens of Athens and the whole imperial family. To honor his memory, Balbilla and the Athenians made a marble tomb monument for him. The hill where it's built is known today as the Philopappos Hill.

Philopappos Monument
Mouseion Hill
Athens
Greece

Choragic Monument of Lysicrates

The Choragic Monument of Lysicrates near the Acropolis of Athens is one of the first Greek monuments built according to the Corinthian order, one of the top three classical styles of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. Marked by its circular structure raised on a high-squared podium, this monument comes from the choregos Lysicrates, known as a patron of many theatrical performances in the Theater of Dionysus. This choregos was a popular sponsor paying and supervising the training of dramatic dance-chorus during his time. And in 335 or 334 B.C., he built the site to commemorate the award of first prize to one of his sponsored performances.

Choragic Monument of Lysicrates
Lysicrates, Athens 10558
Greece

Article Written By Rianne Hill Soriano

Rianne Hill Soriano is a freelance artist/writer/educator. Her diverse work experiences include projects in the Philippines, Korea and United States. For more than six years she has written about films, travel, food, fashion, culture and other topics on websites including Yahoo!, Yehey! and Herword. She also co-wrote a book about Asian cinema.

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