Major Monuments in D.C.

Major Monuments in D.C.
Those who wish to experience some of the most famous monuments in the country will find familiar sights in Washington, D.C. As free sites, open to the public every day, these major monuments are within walking distance of each other, as they are all in the expansive West Potomac Park.

Washington Monument

One of the most famous monuments in the entire country, the Washington Monument is a memorial to the first U.S. president. It is the tallest obelisk in the world, 555 feet high. Made of sandstone, marble and granite, it is also the tallest stone structure in the world and the tallest structure in the Washington, D.C., area. Construction began in 1848 and was completed in 1884, with the monument formally dedicated in 1885 on George Washington's birthday, Feb. 22. A long reflector pool is situated below the monument.

Washington Monument
17th St. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20024
202-426-6839
nps.gov/wamo

Lincoln Memorial

This designated national memorial dedicated to America's 16th president is one of the most impressive monuments in the country, let alone D.C. A large sculpture of a sitting Lincoln is set within a Greek-style temple with 36 columns that are 37 feet high. Nearly 4 million people visit this monument every year, and many find inspiration in the president who sacrificed so much for American freedom and unity. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his "I have a dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The monument is also seen on the back of every five dollar bill and penny.

Lincoln Memorial
Lincoln Memorial Circle S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20037
202-426-6895
nps.gov/linc

Jefferson Memorial

The American Institute of Architects named the Jefferson Memorial fourth on its list of America's favorite architecture. Though it's not visited as much as the other two monuments, it still draws more than 2 million visitors every year. A statue of the third president is in the center of the neoclassical, open-air building. It was designated a U.S. national memorial in 1943. Surrounded by Japanese cherry trees, it was designed by John Russell Pope and is free and open to the public every day, 24 hours a day.

Jefferson Memorial
301 Seventh St. S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20407
202-426-6822
nps.gov/thje

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