Monuments in Liege, Belgium

Monuments in Liege, Belgium
At the convergence of the Meuse and Ourthe rivers sits Liege, Belgium. After Belgium gained independence from the Netherlands in 1830, Liege became a hub for industrial activity, building the first European locomotive and creating the process of Bessemer steel production. Numerous monuments in Liege pay homage to important people and events in the city's history.

Allies' Memorial

The first battle of World War I occurred in Liege. To commemorate the city's resistance against the Germans, the Allies' Memorial was built. Designed by Antwerp architect Joseph Smolderen, the memorial holds several monuments given to Liege by other allied nations. Italy, Spain, France, Romania, Spain, Greece, Great-Britain, Poland and Russia are all represented here.

Allies' Memorial
Rue Saint-Maur 93
4000 Liege
Belgium
+04-221-92-21

Cathédrale St-Paul

The Cathédrale St-Paul, which dominates the northern part of the square, holds many statues by Jean Delcour, including one of the cathedral's namesake, Saint Paul. The cathedral also houses the Reliquary of Charles the Bold of Burgundy. Presented by Charles in 1471 as a penance for destroying the city in 1468, the reliquary features gold and enamel images of Saint George as well as Charles the Bold. As of 2010, visiting the cathedral is free, but visiting the Treasury, which contains the reliquary, costs €4.

Cathédrale St-Paul
rue Bonne-Fortune 6
Nouvelle Ville
4000 Liege
Belgium
+04-232-6131

The Perron

In the center of the Place du Marché is the Perron, monument to the freedom of Liege. Destroyed by Charles the Bold in 1468, it was rebuilt by his daughter, Mary of Burgundy. The current monument was built in 1697 and designed by Jean Delcour. The monument features four lions who hold up a column featuring the three graces. The graces carry a pine cone, which is a symbol of Liege's freedom.

The Perron
Place du Marché
Coeur Historique
4000 Liege
Belgium
+04-221-9221

Montagne de Bueren

These 373 steps rise above Hors-Château up to Liege's Citadelle in honor of Vincent Van Bueren, who lead the resistance against Charles the Bold in 1468. Van Bueren climbed this hill, along with 600 men, to ambush and kill Charles. Despite Van Bueren's efforts, Charles still managed to overtake the city.

Montagne de Bueren
Hors-Château
Coeur Historique
4000 Liege
Belgium

Article Written By Patrick Bryant

Patrick Bryant has worked as a writer for 10 years. His work has appeared on Fox, CBS, MTV, Comedy Central, AOL, National Public Radio, Global TV and at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. He holds a Bachelor of Arts from Emerson College.

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