Wooden Walking Bridges in New Hampshire

Wooden Walking Bridges in New Hampshire
New Hampshire is known for its covered wooden walking bridges, also known as "kissing bridges." During the 1800s, there were nearly 400 bridges built by skilled craftsmen. The bridges were vital for New Hampshire's transportation network. Now, with just over 50 remaining, the bridges are treasured by locals and visitors for their heritage.

Bartlett Bridge

The Bartlett Bridge was originally built in 1851. It is located in the White Mountains and crosses the Saco River. The bridge is 166 feet long. In 1939, it was abandoned and closed to traffic. Years later it was rebuilt for $20,000. Today, the bridge is a gift shop and pedestrians can walk across the structure. Located four and a half miles east of Bartlett Village in New Hampshire, the Bartlett Bridge was last renovated in 1990 when one layer of decking was removed, arches were strengthened and cracked members were replaced.

Bartlett Bridge
Bartlett, NH
nh.gov/nhdhr/bridges

Cornish-Windsor Bridge

The lattice truss-style Cornish-Windsor Bridge spans the Connecticut River. It's the longest wooden covered bridge in the country. Step onto the 550-foot bridge in Cornish, New Hampshire and walk across it to the town of Windsor, Vermont. Built in 1866 for $9,000, the bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. When the bridge was built, it was framed in a meadow and moved to its present location. The state of New Hampshire purchased the bridge in 1936; it operated as a toll bridge until 1943. In 1954, the state renovated the bridge, but in 1977 flood water and ice damaged the structure. It was repaired again for $25,000, but due to its deteriorating condition, the Cornish-Windsor Bridge closed in 1987. After reconstructing the bridge in 1989 for a whopping $4, 450,000, it once again opened to traffic in 1989. The bridge is featured on the Town Bicentennial Medal struck in 1976.

The Cornish-Windsor Bridge
Cornish, NH
nh.gov/nhdhr/bridges

The Happy Corner Bridge

In the late 1800s, Happy Corner was a thriving little neighborhood. The town consisted of a store, post office, saw mill, starch mill, barber shop, school and the Temperance Hall. In the mid-1800s, the Happy Corner Bridge was built over the Perry Stream. The paddleford truss-style bridge with added arches is 60 feet 6 inches long. It is one of the oldest covered wooden bridges in New Hampshire. It was once repaired for a mere $12,000 in the mid-1960s. The Happy Corner Bridge is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Happy Corner Bridge
Pittsburg, NH
nh.gov/nhdhr/bridges

Article Written By Susan Fogwell

Susan Fogwell is a flight attendant for a major airline and a freelance travel and lifestyle writer. Her far-flung travels have taken her to six continents. As a seasoned traveler, Fogwell has written hundreds of travel articles for a variety of print and online publications, including the "LA Times," "Orlando Sentinel" and "Caribbean Compass."

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