Ketchikan, Alaska Fishing

Ketchikan, Alaska Fishing
Located in southeast Alaska, the Ketchikan region is known for abundant salmon, trout, halibut and Dolly Varden. The region has remote opportunities for freshwater and saltwater fishing and is home to numerous guides and lodges. The coastal location receives heavy rainfall, which has created numerous streams and rivers full of fish. Ketchikan also has thick old growth forests and mountain scenery.

Salmon

Salmon are the major attraction for many Ketchikan visitors. The area is home to healthy runs of king, silver, sockeye, chum and pink salmon each year. The monster king and sockeye salmon are found in the river systems from June through August while the silver salmon are abundant from August to September. Pink salmon are caught in the river systems between July and September. The less-targeted chum salmon are caught between July and October. Anglers fishing for salmon in Ketchikan use large, brightly colored lures or treble hooks. Salmon can also be caught in the ocean; some species are available year-round.

Trout

Ketchikan is home to trophy-size trout accustomed to feeding on salmon eggs, insects and mice. Mice patterns are popular with fly fisherman in the spring and summer months. During the salmon runs, trout are caught by drifting glo-bugs and beaded egg patterns. The rainbow trout of Ketchikan can grow to trophy sizes: Numerous two-foot long fish are caught each year. The area is also home to sea-run cutthroat trout and migrating steelhead. The trout, sea-run cutthroat trout and steelhead are caught on fly and conventional fishing tackle. Brightly colored lures, eggs and bait are effective for targeting these species.

Ocean species

The coastal area of Ketchikan provides sport fisherman with large halibut caught from charter boats. Deep sea fisherman will find a variety of tasty bottom dwelling fish. Ocean fisherman also target salmon as they migrate towards the mouths of rivers in preparation for the spawning season. The salmon are aggressive as they try to stockpile calories before making the long journey up the river. The salmon are also "fresh" and valued for the quality of their meat.

Article Written By Zach Lazzari

Zach Lazzari is an outdoor writing specialist. He has experience in website writing as well as standard newspaper writing. He wrote an outdoor column for the Silver World in Lake City, Colo., and articles for Colorado-mountain-adventure.com. Lazzari is currently completing his bachelor's degree online through Arizona State University and lives in southwest Montana.

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