Campgrounds in Whittier, Alaska

Campgrounds in Whittier, Alaska
Whittier is in south-central Alaska, and is a haven for fishing, boating, marine and coastal wildlife viewing, kayaking, cruising, sailing and glacier trekking. Whittier is located at the head of Passage Canal, which is a deepwater cruise port in Prince William Sound. It is about 50 miles southeast of Anchorage by way of the Seward Highway and about 418 miles from Fairbanks. There are many campsites in Whittier and the surrounding area, but they are mostly rural and are for camping in the true sense of the word, in tents.
 

Whittier, Alaska Public Campground

In the town of Whittier, off of Glacier Avenue, is a public campground for those who are coming through with a vehicle, or who wish to pitch a tent, but want to stay close to town instead of venturing off to one of the many tent sites around Whittier that may only be accessed by kayak or small boat. The campground is open May 1 through October 31 and is not paved, but some of the sites have picnic tables. There are very few amenities and no hookups. There is a creek running through the picturesque campground and all sites have views of the mountains. Though the campground is located slightly above town, it is within an easy walk. You must use the two-mile Whittier Tunnel to gain access to the town, and there is a small fee for tunnel passage.

Whittier Parking and Camping
PO Box 741
Whittier, Alaska 99693
907-472-2670
http://www.alaskawhittier.com/campground.php

 
 

Decision Point Marine Park

This park is about eight miles from Whittier at the east end of Passage Canal. This is a popular park to use if you are kayaking, but there is no good anchorage for larger boats. There are two great camping beaches here among the spruce and hemlocks. One of the sand beaches is at the head of Squirrel Cove and has room for two tents, except the during the highest tide cycles. At the western side of the cove there are spaces for three more tents with platforms, a cooking area, and bear-proof food locker. There is a latrine at the far edge of the campground. There is no drinking water at these campsites. At the second beach, which is less sand and more pebble--slightly south of Decision Point--there is room for placing as many as 10 tents on flat ground that is above the tide line. There are two campfire rings here and water is available at the bend in the small peninsula. Larger groups of kayakers are common at this site.

Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Public Information Center
Robert B. Atwood Building
550 W. 7th Ave, Suite 1260
Anchorage, AK 99501-3557
907-269-8901
http://www.dnr.alaska.gov/parks/

Suprise Cove State Marine Park

On the western side of the entrance to Cochrane Bay there are seven camp sites located on a variety of topography. There is room for 12 twelve tents above the gravel beach on the inside of the north entrance to the cove. There are three tent platforms against the hill in this area and a bear-proof food locker and latrine are at the center of this beach. The other large site in this area is just northeast of Point Cochrane, above a piece of exposed beach where five tents may fit. There are two separate tent sites up on dryer land by the northern bend in the coastline, two on wetlands above the beach, one on the northern bend on moss in the trees, and another on a small rock outcrop. Drinking water must be collected from the streams so bring your preferred method of water purification with you.

Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Public Information Center
Robert B. Atwood Building
550 W. 7th Ave, Suite 1260
Anchorage, AK 99501-3557
907-269-8901
http://www.dnr.alaska.gov/parks/

 

Article Written By Naomi Judd

Naomi M. Judd is a naturalist, artist and writer. Her work has been published in various literary journals, newspapers and websites. Judd holds a self-designed Bachelor of Arts in adventure writing from Plymouth State University and is earning a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from the University of Southern Maine.

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