Best Spider Wire Fishing Knots

Best Spider Wire Fishing Knots
Spider Wire fishing line is a braided line that is constructed of small fibers that are wound together to produce a line that is low stretch and very strong for its thin size. Since this line is very slick, it takes special knots in order to keep the line from slipping free during a prolonged battle with a trophy fish.

Uni Knot

The Uni Knot works well with braided lines such as Spider Wire, as this knot does not slip. Begin by placing the end of the line through the eye of the hook or lure and double it back to parallel the main line. Make a loop in the line by laying the end of the line over the double line. Make six turns with the tag end of the line through the loop and around the double line. Moisten the line and pull the end to tighten the knot and then pull the main line to snug the knot down to the eye of the hook or lure.

Palomar Knot

This knot provides a near 100 percent strong knot, meaning the knot does very little to decrease the overall strength of the line. Begin by doubling over 4 to 6 inches of the line to form a tight loop and pass this loop through the eye of the hook. Take the loop and make a simple overhand knot with the doubled line, making sure the hook is hanging at the bottom. Hold the overhand knot with your thumb and forefinger and place the loop over the hook and slide the loop above the eye of the hook. Pull the main line and tag line tight to form the knot.

Non-Slip Loop Knot

Loop knots work well to enhance the action of some lures, such as a crank bait or swim bait. The non-slip loop knot works well with braided lines because it holds tight and does not slip as the name implies.
Begin by making an overhand knot in the line 10 inches from the eye of the hook or lure. Place the tag end through the lure eye and back through the loop in the overhand knot on the main line. Wrap the tag end around the main line five or six times and bring the tag end through the overhand knot. Moisten the knot and pull slowly on the tag end until the wraps come together, then pull the main line to seat the knot in place.

Resources

Article Written By Brian M. Kelly

Brian M. Kelly has been freelance writing since 2003. His work has been published in respected outdoor magazines such as Outdoor Life, Great Lakes Angler and Salmon Trout Steelheader. He holds an associate's degree in automated machine design from Macomb College.

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