Types of Survival Animal Traps

Types of Survival Animal TrapsIn order to adequately prepare for a survival situation, you must plan for the unexpected. Although most survival situations are resolved before starvation becomes a real danger, learning how to gather food should be an essential part of your training. There are some basic types of animal traps that, when combined with foraging for edible vegetation, can provide you with a good survival food source.

Deadfall Trap

A deadfall is one of the simplest and most effective animal traps. It is simply a heavy weight, such as a rock or log, that is suspended over bait attached to a trigger. When an animal tries to eat the bait, it will spring the trap and the weight will fall, killing the animal.

Snares

Snares are also very effective traps in their simplest form, although they can take many shapes and complex designs. The most common type of snare is a thin piece of looped wire that is attached to a power mechanism, such as a bent sapling, that will spring when an animal disturbs the wire. As the loaded sapling snaps back, the wire is pulled tight around the animal's neck. Used correctly, this trap is a humane way of taking game, though to be effective it should be placed across a known animal trail.

Spears and Projectiles

Among the most complicated forms of animal traps are spears and projectiles. These traps consist of a short sharpened stick placed under load by a bent sapling or bow. A wire is placed across an animal run, and when it is disturbed, the spear is released and driven into the animal. Although this method is very complicated and less successful than simpler designs, spears can be made to take larger game than snares or deadfalls.

Article Written By Greg Johnson

Greg Johnson earned his Bachelor of Arts in creative writing from The Ohio University. He has been a professional writer since 2008, specializing in outdoors content and instruction. Johnson's poetry has appeared in such publications as "Sphere" and "17 1/2 Magazine."

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