Breathing Exercises for Running

Breathing Exercises for Running
Running is an aerobic exercise. The word "aerobic" literally means "with oxygen." To get oxygen into the lungs, you need to breathe. While this should seem obvious, some runners have a shallow or labored breathing style. In some cases, this may result in severe muscle cramps, side stitches, poor performance or premature fatigue.
Furthermore, shallow breathing can sometimes result in a state of anxiety. Since many people run for purposes of relaxation, this is counter-productive. Additionally, anxiety causes physical tension, and tension can drain energy. That's less energy you have for your workout.

Deep Breathing

Most runners only make use of the upper two thirds of their lung capacity. However, diaphragmatic breathing, which fills the lower part of the lungs, can increase a runner's aerobic capacity, reduce stress and even eliminate the dreaded runner's cramps.

Deep breathing exercises can be performed prior to a run or during a run. However, depending on when they are performed, there is a slight variation in technique. Prior to a run, take a deep breath in through the nose and hold for five counts. Then, slowly release the breath through the mouth. Holding the breath during a run is not recommended. Simply breathe in for five counts, and then breathe out for five counts. Keep in mind that it is not always easy to breathe through the nose while running. If this is the case, go ahead and breathe through the mouth.

Many runners do not realize that while they run, they are holding tension in their shoulders, wrists, hands and jaws. The exhalation phase of the deep breathing exercise is a good time to release this tension. As you exhale, you can shake out your hands, roll your shoulders and open your mouth to relax your jaw.

Cadenced Breathing

Although cadenced breathing may be difficult to master, it can be an excellent way to coordinate your breathing patterns with your running movements. In fact, elite runners use this method as a means of ensuring an even rhythm to their running. Most elite athletes use a 2-to-2 breathing cadence. This means that they take two steps per inhale, and two steps per exhale. At the end of the race, they might switch to a 2-to-1 cadence, which involves a two-count inhalation followed by one-count exhalation.

However, the 2-to-2 and the 2-to-1 breathing patterns may cause novice runners to get a bit light headed. If this happens, try a 3-to-3 breathing pattern.

The Cleansing Breath

When you wake up feeling congested, it may be difficult to motivate yourself for a run. Provided that you are not seriously ill, the cleansing breath can open your sinuses and clear out congestion, which might make it easier to go for a run.

The cleansing breath is borrowed from yoga. Use the two middle fingers of your left hand to close off your right nostril. Breathe in for four counts through your left nostril. Then, use your thumb to close the nostril. Hold the breath for four counts, and then release your fingers from your right nostril, and let the breath out for eight counts.
Repeat the process on the right nostril, using your right hand to close off the left nostril. After you've repeated the exercise a few times, you might want, and in fact be able to blow your nose.

Article Written By Lisa Mercer

In 1999, Lisa Mercer’s fitness, travel and skiing expertise inspired a writing career. Her books include "Open Your Heart with Winter Fitness" and "101 Women's Fitness Tips." Her articles have appeared in "Aspen Magazine," "HerSports," "32 Degrees," "Pregnancy Magazine" and "Wired." Mercer has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the City College of New York.

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